Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

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Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

Post by Viper on Thu 28 Jun 2018, 7:34 am

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Re: Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

Post by Galadren on Tue 23 Oct 2018, 8:46 pm

Neo-Nazis chatted about joining Canadian military reserves, report says

Oct 23, 2018


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Re: Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

Post by Sandman on Mon 29 Oct 2018, 9:12 pm

Canadian Forces looking into allegations of white-supremacist material being sold at military-surplus store run by soldiers

GLORIA GALLOWAY PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER
OTTAWA
PUBLISHED OCT 29, 2018

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-canadian-forces-looking-into-allegations-of-white-supremacist-material/

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Re: Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

Post by Zantar on Tue 30 Oct 2018, 6:49 pm

Defence minister says he’s monitoring investigation of members accused of white supremacist ties

October 30 2018


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Re: Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

Post by RevForce on Wed 31 Oct 2018, 2:55 pm

Rhodesian flags, white supremacist podcast appearance prompts Canadian Forces investigation

October 31, 2018


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Re: Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

Post by Hunter on Wed 31 Oct 2018, 7:41 pm

Far-right group Proud Boys banned from Facebook, Instagram

Move follows clash between all-male, alt-right group and protesters in Manhattan

The Associated Press · Posted: Oct 31, 2018


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Re: Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

Post by Bruce72 on Wed 31 Oct 2018, 8:06 pm

The Proud Boys. The Jerky Boys is more like it. Bunch of morons.
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Re: Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

Post by Forcell on Thu 01 Nov 2018, 1:05 pm

Far-right Proud Boys and their Canadian founder Gavin McInnes booted off Facebook and Instagram

November 1, 2018


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Re: Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

Post by Armour+ on Sat 10 Nov 2018, 10:18 am

Three soldiers suspended over online surplus store said to be selling white-supremacist merchandise

GLORIA GALLOWAY PARLIAMENTARY REPORTER
OTTAWA
PUBLISHED: Nov 09, 2018

The Canadian military has suspended four of its active members as it looks into allegations that they are running an online army-surplus store catering to white supremacists.

The Canadian Forces said in a statement on Friday that, as of Wednesday of this week, all of the soldiers who are behind Fireforce Ventures, a Calgary-based operation that sells the clothes and memorabilia of foreign militaries, have been “relieved from the performance of their duties” pending the outcome of an investigation.

The suspended men include reservists Henry Lung, Ryan Jorgenson and W. Taylor, as well as Kyle Porter, who is a full-time member of the military. All are stationed in Alberta.

“This decisive action is necessary due to the severity of the allegations and the potential impact on unit morale and cohesiveness,” the military said in the statement. “Racist conduct, be it through words or actions, is completely incompatible with our values and culture.“

While Fireforce Ventures sells military clothes from a number of different countries including Germany, Sweden, Israel and Russia, it specializes in merchandise related to the short-lived and white-ruled state of Rhodesia, which is now Zimbabwe.

Fireforce’s website says it was “founded by a few guys from Canada who initially just wanted to get their hands on some Rhodesian brushstroke camouflage.”

But Fireforce was a military tactic used by the Rhodesian security forces during the Rhodesian Bush Wars in which the government tried to suppress the black-led militias and maintain a segregationist state.

And, in recent years, Rhodesia has become a symbol of the white-supremacist movement in the United States. Dylann Roof, who killed nine black people in a racially motivated attack on a church in Charleston, S.C., in 2015, had been photographed with a Rhodesian flag on his jacket.

A disclaimer on the site says Fireforce does not attempt to make any political or racial statements with its products and it reserves the right to refuse sales to customers who are members of an identifiable hate group.

When the Canadian Forces learned in April that Private Lung and Corporal Taylor were involved in the online surplus store, it conducted an investigation and concluded that its code of ethics had not been breached and the two men were merely operating a legal business during their civilian hours.

But, in late October, the military was informed by Ricochet, an online media organization, that Pte. Lung had allegedly participated in a podcast that holds white-supremacist views. That prompted an additional investigation by the Canadian Forces National Investigation Service as well as an internal summary investigation.


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Re: Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

Post by Tazzer on Sat 10 Nov 2018, 7:10 pm

Four military members suspended over alleged connection to racist website

Published Saturday, November 10, 2018


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Re: Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

Post by Powergunner on Mon 19 Nov 2018, 8:01 pm

FBI labels Proud Boys as extremist group with ties to white nationalists, but no similar move in Canada

Published:
November 19, 2018


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Re: Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

Post by Forcell on Thu 29 Nov 2018, 8:06 am

Neo-Nazis in the Canadian Military

by Yves Engler / November 28th, 2018

Given that people who espouse neo-Nazi ideology are attracted to the military, it is disappointing to learn what a poor job the generals do to uncover and expel them. Or perhaps the inaction reflects a deeper problem.

A recent stream of stories about right wing extremists in the Canadian military prompted the leadership to scramble to get ahead of the story. But, the Chief of the Defence Staff’s effort to simply blame low-ranking individual members was neither convincing, nor satisfying.

Ricochet reported that three soldiers in Alberta operated an online white supremacist military surplus store that glorifies white ruled Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe).

VICE concluded that Nova Scotia reservist Brandon Cameron was a prominent member of the neo-Nazi Atomwaffen Division.

The three founders of Québec anti-Islam/immigrant “alt right” group La Meute are ex-military. Radio-Canada found that 75 members of La Meute’s private Facebook group were Canadian Forces members.

On Canada Day 2017 five CF members disrupted an indigenous rally in front of a statue of violent colonialist Edward Cornwallis in Halifax. The soldiers were members of the Proud Boys, which described itself as “a fraternal organization of Western Chauvinists who will no longer apologize for creating the modern world.”

The CF’s response to these embarrassing stories is to claim these soldiers don’t reflect the institution. In a Toronto Star article titled “Right-wing extremism not welcome in Canadian Armed Forces — but ‘clearly, it’s in here,’ says top soldier”, John Vance claimed racist individuals slip through “unknown to the chain of command.” But, is that answer convincing or does the CF hierarchy share blame for far rightists in the force?

Over the past four years over 1,000 Canadian troops (a rotation of 200 every six months) has deployed to the Ukraine to train a force that includes the best-organized neo-Nazis in the world. Far right militia members are part of the force fighting Russian-aligned groups in eastern Ukraine. Five months ago Canada’s military attaché in Kiev, Colonel Brian Irwin, met privately with officers from the Azov battalion, who use the Nazi “Wolfsangel” symbol and praise officials who helped slaughter Jews during World War II. According to Azov, the Canadian military officials concluded the June briefing by expressing “their hopes for further fruitful cooperation.”

Sympathy for the far right in Ukraine has been displayed by the CF on other occasions. In February 2016, for instance, “nearly 200 officer cadets and professors of Canada’s Royal Military College” attended a screening of Ukrainians/Les Ukrainiens: God’s Volunteer Battalion, which praised far right militias fighting in that country.

More generally, Canadians have fundraised for and joined rightist militias fighting in the Ukraine. For their part, top politicians have spoken alongside and marched with members of Ukraine’s Right Sector, which said it was “defending the values of white, Christian Europe against the loss of the nation and deregionalisation.”

(In a story titled “US-Funded Neo-Nazis in Ukraine Mentor US White Supremacists” Max Blumenthal recently described how Washington’s support for the far right in the Ukraine has blown back. He reported, “an unsealed FBI indictment of four American white supremacists from the Rise Above Movement (RAM) declared that the defendants had trained with Ukraine’s Azov Battalion, a neo-Nazi militia officially incorporated into the country’s national guard.”)

In addition to supporting fascistic elements in Eastern Europe, the CF’s authoritarian, patriarchal and racist structure lends itself to rightist politics.

Ranging from Private Basic/Ordinary Seaman to General/Admiral, there are nineteen ranks in the CF. In deference to authority, lower must salute and obey orders from higher ranks. In addition to the hierarchy, the CF has been highly patriarchal. Until 1989 women were excluded from combat roles and the submarine service was only opened to women in 2000. As has been discussed elsewhere, extreme patriarchy represents a sort of gateway ideology to the far right.

The CF has also been a hot bed of white supremacy. For decades institutional racism was explicit with “coloured applicants” excluded from enlisting in several positions until the 1950s. Despite making up 20 percent of the Canadian population, visible minorities represent 8.2 percent of the CF (it may be slightly higher since some choose not to self-identify). In 2016 three former CF members sued over systemic racism. Their suit claimed that “derogatory slurs, racial harassment and violent threats are tolerated or ignored …. Victims of racism within the Canadian Forces are forced into isolation, subjected to further trauma and, in many cases, catapulted toward early release.”

Chief of the Defence Staff John Vance’s effort to blame right wing extremism on a few bad apples won’t do. The CF needs to look at how its decisions and culture stimulates right-wing extremism.



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Re: Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

Post by Kizzer on Wed 02 Jan 2019, 8:45 am

Military says it’s aware of 30 members who hold ‘discriminatory’ views

By BRUCE CAMPION-SMITHOttawa Bureau
Tues., Jan. 1, 2019



OTTAWA—Canada’s military is “aware” of some 30 personnel known to be part of hate groups or who hold “discriminatory” views, the Star has learned.

Gen. Jonathan Vance, the chief of defence staff, said the number of people who harbour such beliefs is likely higher but insists it is still a fraction of the 95,000 personnel in uniform.





“The numbers are very small. We do investigate and track. We have a fairly good system to do that,” Vance told the Star in a year-end interview.

Faced with questions about potential right-wing extremists in its ranks, the military police criminal intelligence section did an assessment last fall to better understand the scale of the problem.

That review found that between 2013 and 2018, about 55 members of the military were part of hate groups or had made statements and taken actions that “could be viewed as discriminatory.”

That would cover a range of activities, from an inappropriate comment in a barracks to espousing views on social media or in a chat room.


Thirty are still in the military. Vance said that estimate is probably low but adds, “that’s what we can see.”

“If one keeps it completely secret and it doesn’t have an impact on your workplace ... we’re not going to detect it,” he said.

“But there are many who, outside of working hours, they get themselves on social media and they can be found out that way,” he said.

“On average we detect about five instances a year where somebody expresses an opinion or does an act that would, on a range of extremist behaviour, trip our ethics wire,” Vance said.

Vance first spoke with the Star on the issue in October, when he acknowledged that while people with such views aren’t welcome in the Armed Forces, some still get past pre-recruitment screening and are able to enlist.

In recent years, several high-profile incidents of military personnel associated with far-right groups have forced the Canadian Armed Forces to confront the problem. In the most prominent of the cases, five Canadian Forces members — each of them members of the “Proud Boys” movement who proclaim their “Western chauvinism” — disrupted an Indigenous protest in Halifax.

An investigation last year by Radio-Canada found about 75 Armed Forces members were part of a private Facebook group associated with anti-immigration and anti-Islam views.

But Vance again stressed that “good militaries aren’t racist.” Once detected, the Armed Forces is faced with the question of what action it should take against personnel found to have acted inappropriately. Vance admits that many advocate a “heavy-handed” approach to drum offenders out of uniform.

“You have to remember that we are also an employer that follows due process. So opportunities for rehabilitation are important. We also have all sorts of administrative measures from counselling to probation that are intended to allow some to recover,” he said.

The Queen’s Regulations and Orders sets out expectations for those in uniform. In the section on personal conduct, it makes clear that officers and non-commissioned members are barred from saying or doing anything in public that “might reflect discredit on the Canadian Forces or on any of its members.”





Vance was careful to make the distinction around any acts that could be considered criminal. “If it’s criminal, we would take action instantly.” But he said education has proven effective in countering such views and that some of those already identified have been counselled.

“I think sometimes people just don’t know what is really crossing the line,” he said.

Vance stressed that the small number doesn’t diminish his concern for the problem and its potential impact on the military.

“It’s a huge concern for us for a variety of reasons but the reputation of the Armed Forces as a symbol of what the country stands for is important. This country doesn’t stand for that extremist view. We don’t,” Vance said.

He said extremist views are corrosive and undermine the military’s “warrior ethos” that is designed to “ensure cohesiveness and morale in combat.”

“We’re warriors. We’re designed to work in teams where everyone around you you can trust. That’s a warrior ethos that I hold dearly and most people in Armed Forces do,” he said.

“We have to reinforce that. It’s a very, very powerful thing,” he said.

Still, Vance said the issue has sparked discussions in defence headquarters about more “robust training” for new recruits to better instill values that will help stamp out not only what he called “dangerous” extremist views but sexual misconduct and harassment, another problem the military has been grappling with.

“We do it now. We may need to add some more to our training,” Vance said.

“As we bring in people to the Armed Forces, I’m actively considering right now for the future perhaps a more robust beginning period, that before we teach you the military arts and virtues, we need to have a period of baseline acceptable behaviour, not just from the perspective of the Armed Forces, but just acceptable behaviour,” he said.

With files from Alex Boutilier

Bruce Campion-Smith is an Ottawa-based reporter covering national politics. Follow him on Twitter: @yowflier


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Re: Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

Post by Cassey on Sat 05 Jan 2019, 8:42 pm

Is There A Radical Right Racism Problem In The Canadian Armed Forces?

Numerous reports, investigations, and the exposure of a neo-Nazi among their ranks raise concerns about the state of the Canadian Armed Forces.

by: Yannick Veilleux-Lepage on January 5, 2019





Last month, the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) announced that it had suspended four soldiers from their duties for running an ‘army-surplus’ website that largely catered to white supremacists by selling clothing, flags, and other items glorifying the – unrecognized – and white-ruled African state of Rhodesia. This represents just the latest in a series of high profile incidents involving CAF soldiers or sailors associated with radical right groups. This year, an investigation conducted by Vice News in collaboration with the Canadian Anti-Hate Network and the Southern Poverty Law Center reported that an army reservist in Nova Scotia was a prominent member of Atomwaffen Division.

The members of this neo-Nazi group are preparing for a race war to combat what they consider to be the cultural and racial displacement of the white race, and have been tied to an attempted bombing and numerous hate crimes, including five racially motivated murders. Another investigation, this time by CBC/Radio-Canada raised concerns over the participation of active CAF members on the public Facebook group of La Meute. La Meute is a Quebec-based group founded by two Canadian Armed Forces veterans which reinterprets First Nations, neo-pagan, and Christian spiritual traditions in order to develop a new cultural identity for Quebecois. Lastly, on Canada Day in 2017, five Canadian Forces members – members of the “Proud Boys” movement who proudly proclaim their ‘Western chauvinism’ – disrupted an Indigenous protest in Halifax.

Whilst the military brass in Canada are scrambling to denounce and address such cases of racism and radical-right extremism within the Canadian military, the intersection of individuals aligned with radical right groups and the military is by no means an issue limited to Canada. Indeed, such connections appear to have plagued almost every NATO member country. Notably, four serving members of the British Armed Forces were recently arrested under anti-terror laws on suspicion of being members of the banned neo-nazi group National Action, and in Germany authorities uncovered a plot by a covert network of some 200 neo-Nazi far-right soldiers and veterans of an elite commando unit to murder left-wing politicians and asylum seekers.


Moreover, as far back as 2008, the FBI warned that leaders of radical right groups were “making a concerted effort to recruit active-duty soldiers and recent combat veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan,” suggesting that most hardcore extremist groups, “have some members with military experience, and those with military experience often hold positions of authority within the groups to which they belong.” The report further highlighted that “military experience is found throughout the white supremacist extremist movement as the result of recruitment campaigns by extremist groups and self-recruitment by veterans sympathetic to white supremacist causes.” Indeed, it has long been theorized that radical right groups deliberately attempted to recruit individuals with military experience to “exploit their skills and knowledge derived from military training and combat.”

A summary search of Stormfront Canada and Stormfront Quebec subforums (subsections of the biggest neo-Nazi website) shows that discussions about joining the Canadian Armed Forces tend to emphasize three distinct themes: First, the individual socio-economic benefits of joining the CAF, such as free education and the acquisition of transferable skills. Second, denunciation of military or foreign policies which run in oppositions to individual posters’ belief systems, (currently this is largely focused around the CAF policy of inclusion which allows transgender people to serve openly in its military forces, or efforts by the CAF to root out radical right elements from their ranks). Lastly, the benefits of gaining access to weapons along with expert weapons training and building leadership skills. This latter theme also featured prominently in a chat log from a now-defunct IronMarch website – an online forum once boasting itself as a sort of fascist Facebook and neo-Nazi chat site – examined by Vice Canada.

In addition to the obvious security threats, the presence of individuals aligned with radical right groups within the CAF should also be viewed as a detriment to unit readiness and successful deployment. At a micro level, trust and camaraderie is necessary for a team to function and fight effectively, and is highly dependent on the ability of the members to communicate at all times. As such, conflict – whether caused by racial tensions, religious intolerance, or political differences – negatively influences communication and disrupts good order and discipline. Moreover, supremacist views, discrimination, and disparate treatment of others jeopardizes combat readiness by weakening interpersonal bonds, fomenting distrust, eroding unit cohesion, and ultimately negating a unit’s ability to operate to its full potential.


On a macro level, radical right ideologies can grow from subtle attitudes and ideologies – which often come from ‘passive participation’ – to create a climate in which a culture of racism and brutality within the ranks is normalized. This was tragically demonstrated by the 1993 Somalia Affair: the torture and murder of Shidane Arone, a Somali teenager caught stealing by Canadian airborne soldiers. In the aftermath of this killing, the CAF was embarrassed by the public release of videotaped footage of racism and brutal hazing in the regiment formerly known for its wartime heroics. One segment depicted Canada’s U.N. peacekeepers in Somalia referring to local citizens using derogatory slurs of a racial nature and joking about hunting Somalis as trophies. Another tape showed a black airborne recruit crawling through a gauntlet of blows and a shower of human waste with the words “I love KKK” scrawled on his back. According to Sherene Razack’s brilliant account of the Somalia Affairs Dark Threats and White Knights, these videos highlighted the embedded racism and violence amongst the soldiers, and the broader acceptance of radical right ideologies within the regiment.

Twenty-five years later, the memory of the killing of an unarmed child at the hands of two Canadian soldiers participating in the United Nations humanitarian efforts in Somalia must – or should – weigh heavily on the minds of military brass now attempting to once again curb the normalization of radical right ideologies within their ranks. The failure to address the proliferation of such ideologies within the ranks of one of Canada’s most esteemed regiments in 1993, not only had fatal consequences, but also greatly damaged the morale of the Canadian Forces and damaged both the domestic and international reputation of Canadian soldiers.

This comprehensive article sources great reporting from top news organizations, but it’s also built on brilliant analysis from our team at Rantt Media. If you like the work we do, please consider supporting us by making a one-time donation or signing up for a monthly subscription.




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Re: Proud Boys military probe involved lots of brass

Post by Bruce72 on Sun 06 Jan 2019, 7:21 am

If racism exists in the Forces, it's because of a lack of leadership.

A serious reckoning about how our Armed Forces are trained and led needs to take place.
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