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Post by SniperGod on Thu 25 Oct 2018, 3:48 pm

Canadian War Museum opens new exhibition commemorating the last 100 days of the First World War

Oct. 25, 2018

https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/canadian-war-museum-opens-new-exhibition-commemorating-the-last-100-days-of-the-first-world-war-698548581.html
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Post by Garrison on Thu 01 Nov 2018, 7:30 pm

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Post by Rockarm on Fri 02 Nov 2018, 4:46 pm

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Post by RevForce on Tue 06 Nov 2018, 8:54 am

Flags of our fathers: Sask. museum showcases flag flown 100 years ago on first Armistice Day

CBC News · Posted: Nov 06, 2018

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Post by RevForce on Wed 07 Nov 2018, 8:18 pm

Peterborough 11-year old establishes military museum in the basement of the family home.

November 7, 2018


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Post by Reggie on Thu 08 Nov 2018, 7:18 am

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Tour of Duty shares stories of Canadian Vietnam War veterans

BY ROB ALEXANDER NOV 8, 2018

BOW VALLEY – A new exhibit at The Military Museums in Calgary is telling the story of the thousands of Canadians who fought with U.S. Forces in Vietnam.

It’s estimated that 40,000 Canadians served with the U.S. during the Vietnam War. The U.S. began its involvement in the war, meant to stop communism from spreading, in 1955, effectively taking over from France that had begun fighting the communist Viet Minh in 1946.

The Viet Minh defeated French forces in 1954. The U.S., meanwhile, began its withdrawal in 1973. Fighting did not formally end until 1975 when communist North Vietnam unified the country.

Rory Cory, senior curator at The Military Museums (TMM) said 103 Canadians died fighting in Vietnam. Two of those soldiers are buried in Calgary cemeteries.

Tour of Duty: Canadians and the Vietnam War, which is being held in the Founders Gallery until Jan. 13, 2019, was built around the personal stories of the Vietnam veterans, largely an untold story in Canada.

“We’re using individuals to tell their stories about the specific part of the timeline they can relate to, so it’s not just me as a historian talking about how the Vietnam War went. It’s them talking about their experiences and you learn about the course of the war through their eyes and through their experiences,” said Cory.

“This is the biggest Vietnam exhibit that I’m aware of in Canada that has ever been mounted and that includes the Canadian War Museum, so it really is an untold story.”

Along with the stories of Canadian veterans who served with U.S. Forces, the exhibit also includes stories of American veterans now living in Canada and South Vietnamese veterans who came to Canada as refugees.

Tour of Duty also explores Canada’s official role in Vietnam as part of the International Commission of Control and Supervision, a peace-keeping mission, which had been tasked with overseeing the U.S. withdrawal from Vietnam.

Unlike soldiers returning from both world wars, Vietnam veterans were not welcomed back with honour and respect, and the idea of sharing their stories didn’t come easily, even 50 years later after some of the major incidents featured in the exhibit, namely the 1968 Tet Offensive and Battle of Khe Sahn.

“These guys were so down trodden, so dishonoured over time that they learned to hide their experiences and be reserved about their experiences and not broadcast them and not be proud of them,” said Cory.

“We actually had people that had been interviewed before and had a lot of their comments used out of context, so they were pretty leery of us at first,” said Cory, adding it took about five years to build trust with the veterans.

“That’s turned out really positive.”

Cory said he hopes Tour of Duty will help Canadians learn about this little-known chapter of Canadian history and give Vietnam veterans the opportunity to be proud of their experiences.

“It’s a healing opportunity really,” Cory said, “a chance to bring together a lot of people. It’s also a chance for Canadians to know about another part of their history. It’s shedding light on an unknown group of veterans.




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Post by Xforce2000 on Fri 09 Nov 2018, 8:11 pm

London’s Royal Canadian Regiment Museum unveils new LAV III

November 9, 2018

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Post by Armour+ on Sat 10 Nov 2018, 10:45 am

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Post by Zephariah on Wed 14 Nov 2018, 4:40 pm

Former Toronto Aerospace Museum secures new airport home

Posted on November 14, 2018 by Kenneth I. Swartz

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Post by Nonzero on Thu 22 Nov 2018, 7:29 am

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Devil's Brigade veterans honoured as war museum unveils Congressional Gold Medal

BLAIR CRAWFORD November 21, 2018

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/devils-brigade-veterans-honoured-as-war-museum-unveils-congressional-gold-medal
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Post by Riverdale on Fri 07 Dec 2018, 3:24 pm

Museum curator remembers Air Force role in Canadian tragedy

December 5, 2018

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. — Jeff Nash was stationed as a tech sergeant in the 436th Airlift Wing at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, when he heard about a C-130 Hercules that crashed just south of Canadian Forces Station Alert on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada.

Nash would not understand the incident’s significance until nearly three decades later when, as curator and assistant director of the Peterson Air and Space Museum, he came across a Facebook post that sparked his interest. Nash shared the post to the museum’s Facebook page and continued researching the day he vaguely remembered but is still annually recognized by the Royal Canadian Air Force.

“I knew the U.S. Air Force was involved, but not to the extent of what I discovered,” Nash said.

Flight 22 of Operation Boxtop — as the biannual resupply mission is called — took off Oct. 30, 1991, from Thule Air Base, Greenland, carrying 3,400 liters of diesel fuel and 18 members of the Canadian Armed Forces, he said.

The pilot lost sight of the runway as the plane began its descent at CFSA, crashing about 16 kilometers south of the station.

“The weather was bad and visibility was low,” Nash said. “On the approach, they misjudged the altitude and crashed.”

Within a half hour of the rescue call, a Hercules carrying 12 search and rescue technicians from 440 Search and Rescue Squadron in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, was in the air. It reached the crash site seven and a half hours later, but the technicians couldn’t descend due to the weather, according to an article published Oct. 30, 2017, by the RCAF.

Another Hercules from 413 Search and Rescue Squadron in Greenwood, Nova Scotia, Canada, also joined the search. Meanwhile, an Alaskan Air National Guard search and rescue team stationed at Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska, was airlifted via a C-5M Super Galaxy cargo plane to Thule, where they joined the search, the article stated.

“The Canadians were highly trained as well but… they didn’t have specialized equipment like helicopters to actually go out and search, recover and rescue,” Nash said. “Two rescue squadrons that specialize in Arctic rescue were called upon to help our Canadian allies.”

More than 30 hours later, the American rescue team found the crash site about 300 miles from the North Pole, Nash said. They found 13 survivors among the crew of 18 — four had died in the crash, while the pilot, Capt. John Couch, died while awaiting rescue.

The rescuers warmed and treated the injured – some soaked in diesel fuel – and prepared them for medical evacuation, according to the RCAF. A Twin Huey helicopter from CFSA made three trips to bring the survivors out of the -4-degree temperatures and back to the station.

The downed C-130 remains at the crash site to this day, preserved by the dry Arctic conditions, according to the article. Each year on Oct. 30, personnel at CFSA begin a parade at 4:30 p.m. and continue through 4:40 p.m., when the Hercules went down.

“They take good care of that,” Nash said.

The incident embodies the relationship U.S. Airmen have with their northern neighbors, he said.

“Here at the museum, we talk a lot about the U.S.-Canada partnership through the North American Aerospace Defense Command,” Nash said.


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Post by kirsch on Thu 20 Dec 2018, 3:43 pm

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WWII bugle heads home

By Roseanne McKee rmckee@examiner-enterprise.com
Posted Dec 20, 2018

A Canadian bugle is on its way home to the Ontario Regiment Royal Canadian Armored Corps Regimental Museum in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada following Wednesday’s sendoff ceremony at the Johnstone-Sare Building in downtown Bartlesville.

Quintin Gomez of Bartlesville found the bugle in an antique shop in Narja, Spain. He’d always wanted an English fox hunt bugle and thought he had one.

“It sat on my desk for a couple of years and one day I started thinking about researching it,” Gomez said. “Come to find out, it was not an English fox hunting bugle. “It belongs to a Canadian Tank Battalion out of Ontario, Canada. Their regiment is called ‘The Black Cats.’ Hence, the emblem on the bugle.”

The emblem, depicting a black cat arching its back, changed over time, but the one shown indicates this one was used in World War II.

“In researching further, this battalion fought with our soldiers in such battles as Monte Casino, Anzio, and all across Italy. It is said that their participation in these battles tied up approximately 100,000 German soldiers that would have been used against us in other campaigns,” Gomez explained.

Gomez, who has non-alcohol related liver failure, decided to return the bugle to Canada while he still could.

“I just want to send it home,” he said.

Gomez said he also wanted to do something for Bartlesville and for the Black Cat Battalion that served so faithfully with the U.S. troops in World War II.

He had a wooden box made by Ken Bottonfield of Bartlesville and had a representative from the U.S. Postal Service, Toni Armitage, to take the boxed bugle to the post office for mailing.

The bugle will be sent to the Ontario Regiment RCAC Regimental Museum in Oshawa, Ontario. The museum’s Executive Director Jeromy Neal Blowers and curator Earl Wooten are anticipating its arrival. The museum is located at 1000 Stevenson Road N, Oshawa, Ontario.

The Chris Gailey American Legion Commander Ray Raley arranged to have the Sons of the American Legion Squadron Leader Kenneth Bond played the bugle one last time before it was sent to Canada. The bugle, which was used to direct troops around the battle field, only plays one note. Bond played the bugle and also played Taps on his trumpet for the guests. Bond was originally recruited by Raley’s father, Don Raley, to play Taps for military funeral when Bond was in seventh grade.

So, for 15 years he’s been playing Taps at funeral services and military functions to honor Veterans who served, Bond said.

An attendee Ken Short read chapter 6 from Isaiah and closed the ceremony with the Lord’s prayer.

Gomez concluded by saying, “we all need to do our part to make our world better and this is a start.”


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Post by Saulman on Fri 28 Dec 2018, 9:31 pm

This tank arsenal near Oshawa is a secret the military museum wants shared

Oshawa’s Ontario Regiment RCAC Military Museum has the most operational historical vehicles in North America, and offers tank ride packages.

Dec 28, 2018

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It is the coldest day of the year so far, and I am doing my best General Patton imitation as I stand on the commander's chair of a tank, popping my head out of the turret as we patrol the frigid tundra of Oshawa.

Despite my best attempt at faking it as a "tough guy in the army," it is clear I am a lot closer to Mash's Radar O'Reilly than Rambo, as my hands feel frostbite setting in while I excitedly try to record a smartphone video on my ride in a Leopard 1A5 tank at the Ontario Regiment RCAC Museum.

I thought a childhood obsessed with G.I. Joe, countless hours playing shooter games on various video game consoles and an excellent knowledge of Hollywood action movies would prepare me for what would be a quick joy ride in an actual tank. I was dead wrong. It was way better than I could have imagined and an absolutely awesome thrill ride.

Jokingly described as "the best kept military secret in southwestern Ontario," the Ontario Regiment RCAC Museum is also known colloquially as the "Tank Museum," as it has the largest collection of operational historical military vehicles in North America, including two M4 Shermans, American M60s, the Soviet BMP1, German-built Leopard — which was designed by Porsche — and many more.

The museum hosts and organizes "Tank Weekends" and offers other experiences that let people take a spin in this behemoths.

Not far from the Oshawa Executive Airport, the museum has a small building with historical displays, replicas and information. It is when you walk out into the large warehouse space, called the Military Vehicle Conservation Centre, where it is really breathtaking as there are so many vehicles sandwiched in together, with so many tanks, armoured personnel carriers, vintage motorcycles and other vehicles.

"We have over 80 vehicles that are operational, and probably about 20 or 30 that are prime candidates to be restored," says Matt Rutledge, operations manager, "We've got Canadian vehicles, British, Soviet, German and more."

It's not just tanks, as Rutledge points to a Chevrolet Radio van from the Second World War. "That was built in Oshawa by General Motors. Serial number 001, so it was the first one off the line of that particular vehicles type. This area really tells the story of World War II, which includes the local Oshawa General Motors story, but also of the British Commonwealth in general."

Rutledge is one of two full-time employees at the museum, but there are more than 140 volunteers who help repair and maintain the vehicles. Although keeping them running is no easy task. The majority of the tanks work on diesel, and while most do not run in the winter, as salt and the elements cause more wear and tear — the museum is much more active in the spring and summer — they all have to be turned on and made sure they are functioning.

"Listen, it is fun to drive these things, although it's not easy," says Rich Bennett, who is in charge of maintenance of the vehicles at the museum. "But the real reason I do this is because you are literally working on a pieces of living history."


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Post by Armour+ on Wed 02 Jan 2019, 8:39 pm

London museum raising funds to get grounded Snowbirds jet flying

JENNIFER BIEMAN January 2, 2019





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Post by Masefield on Wed 09 Jan 2019, 9:19 pm

Calgary Military Museums honour forgotten Canadian Vietnam veterans

Monty Coles of Airdrie says he's touched by recognition after years of name-calling

CBC News · Posted: Jan 09, 2019



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Retired corporal Monty Coles was just 17 years old when he tried to join the U.S. Marine Corps in the controversial war against communism in Vietnam.

His story is the opposite of draft dodgers, who fled the United States for Canada to avoid conscription.

Although Canada did not officially participate in the war, an estimated 40,000 Canadian citizens took part, many by enlisting with the U.S. military.


Now 74 and living in Airdrie, Alta., Coles and other Vietnam veterans are being honoured Wednesday at a ceremony at the Military Museums in Calgary.

The museum has hosted an exhibit since September that features the stories of the Canadian soldiers, as well as those of U.S. and Vietnamese soldiers who later moved to Canada. The ceremony also details Canada's peacekeeping mission in the country.

At the time of the war, Coles was a British teen living in Montreal. So he applied for Canadian citizenship, got a letter of permission from his mother and drove to New York to enlist underage.

Coles, who did three tours, celebrated his 21st birthday on a hill in Vietnam. Upon his return, he said, he encountered pushback from Canadians who opposed the war. The war's goal was controversial, as was the impact on Vietnam. Millions of Vietnamese people were either displaced or killed, including in the brutal massacre of civilians at My Lai by U.S. soldiers.

Coles spoke about his experience as a soldier, and later as a veteran, with Calgary Eyeopener host David Gray.

Q: There was a major incident on the day you were supposed to come home, I am told. Can you tell me about that?

A: Yeah. April 10, 1966, it was my rotation date and they woke me up early in the morning. I'd just come in off patrol and they put me on a vehicle to go to Danang Airport get a flight back to the States.

And on the way to the airport, the vehicle hit a landmine, killed the driver, took both legs off the guy riding shotgun, and I ended up in hospital for a couple of days.

Q: You ended up in the hospital and then you came home. What was the reception like when you came home?

A: Not good, not good. We were classed as mercenaries, baby killers. All kinds of names we were branded with. Nobody respected the Vietnam veteran. We were all branded as crazy Vietnam Veterans. We were shunned, basically.

Q: Where was home for you when you returned? Did you come back to Montreal?

A: Yes, I returned to Montreal, and even here in Canada, when I got off the plane at the airport, I had a long-haired hippie guy came up to me, spit on me. I had my uniform on. He spit on me, called me a baby killer. The reception here was just as bad as it was in the United States.

Q: What's changed between now and then, in your mind?

A: Big, big change. People have accepted the fact that we are veterans, for one thing, and they respect us a lot more than they did back in those days because, like I say, now they accept us as veterans. So there has been a very, very big change towards us.

Q: Now you'll be honoured at an event at the Military Museums. What does this mean to you?

A: It means a lot. There's a lot more awareness nowadays of the Vietnam War, a lot more respect for the guys that fought there. One-hundred-and-fifty-eight Canadians died in Vietnam, and they have to be respected and honoured and remembered.

They are veterans. Whether people like it or not, they are veterans, and they fought for the same reason the Americans did when they came north to Canada during the Second World War. We all fought for the same cause, which was freedom. And these fellows, they have to be respected and remembered.

Q: Once the war was over, said and done and you'd get on with your life, did you ever go back?

A: Yeah, I went back about eight or 10 years ago with my oldest son, and we revisited some of the old battle sites.

It was an eye-opening experience for my son but even more as it was a lot of memories brought back for myself.

Like, we visited one of the hilltops where I had a big battle there and even after 45 or 50 years, our foxholes and our machine gun positions were still there. They had never been filled in. It was pretty sobering.

Q: Emotional for your son. It sounds like it was pretty emotional for you, too?

A: It was. I left a lot of friends there, and it was pretty emotional, yes.


The Vietnam War exhibit at Calgary's Military Museums runs until Jan. 13.



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