2019 Federal Election

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Post by Alpha on Sun 21 Oct 2018, 10:18 am

365 days to go - and Trudeau's Liberals have the edge on the 2019 election

Éric Grenier · CBC News · Posted: Oct 21, 2018

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Post by Xenophon on Sun 21 Oct 2018, 11:20 am

A year away from election day and no-name Scheer is right behind celebrity Trudeau: Ipsos poll

October 21, 2018

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Post by SniperGod on Sun 21 Oct 2018, 9:08 pm

Conservative rally an early indicator of party’s 2019 strategy

By Charlie Pinkerton. Published on Oct 21, 2018

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Post by RunningLight on Wed 31 Oct 2018, 9:55 am

Election 2019: The Canadian foreign policy issues to watch

BY: ANDREW POTTER, STÉFANIE VON HLATKY, NAHEED MUSTAFA / OCTOBER 31, 2018

https://www.opencanada.org/features/election-2019-canadian-foreign-policy-issues-watch/
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Post by Forwardy on Sun 18 Nov 2018, 9:35 pm

Canadian federal election will be target for Russian interference, Sajjan says

Michael MacDonald and Keith Doucette, The Canadian Press
Published Sunday, November 18, 2018

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Post by Forcell on Fri 23 Nov 2018, 10:38 am

Canadian govt. offers huge tax breaks to ‘trusted’ news organizations 11 months prior to election

Thu Nov 22, 2018

OTTAWA, Ontario, November 22, 2018 (LifeSiteNews) – Canada's left-leaning Liberal government is dangling before news organizations a whopping $595 million in tax breaks for media deemed to practice “professional journalism” by an as-yet-to-be-formed independent panel created by the government.

Justin Trudeau's government said the package aims to help what it called “trusted” news organizations.

Conservative news outlets like The Rebel Media and LifeSiteNews are alarmed that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's scheme may amount to a conflict of interest.

LifeSiteNews' vice-president and managing editor, Patrick Craine, says government funding of the media is a bad idea.

"The bottom line is this: a free press cannot be truly free to criticize bad government policies when it has been bought out by the government," said Craine. "We at LifeSiteNews are against this media bailout package. It's bad for the media. It's bad for tax-paying families. And it's bad for Canadian democracy."

The Rebel Media founder Ezra Levant shared similar concerns on the conservative news outlet's website.

"There’s an election next year. And if you are a journalist who wants in on Trudeau’s $595-million slush fund, he has to know that he can trust you," he wrote.

"No tough questions for Trudeau or his cabinet, no matter how incompetent. No embarrassing investigations. You have to demonize any Trudeau critics as 'bigoted' or 'homophobic' or 'Islamophobic.' And you have to promote Trudeau’s policies on everything from the carbon tax to open border mass immigration," he continued.

"Trudeau wants to turn Canada’s newspapers and private TV stations into little replicas of the CBC. He’s buying their loyalty," he added.

This isn't the first time Trudeau has offered Canadian media outlets taxpayer dollars ahead of a federal election.

During the last federal election campaign in 2015, the Liberals promised to increase the annual budget of the country's public broadcaster, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation/RadioCanada, by $150 million.

At The Rebel Media, Levant has already vowed to refuse money from the federal government.

"We take no government money at all. Zero. And we never will. Which is the reason we can say [we] report honestly about Trudeau," wrote Levant. "It’s why he doesn’t 'trust' us. Because we answer only to you, our viewers."

It's clear, though, that many news organizations in Canada are already eagerly awaiting that government media bailout which is to start in January next year.

The president of Unifor, the union that represents almost 12,000 workers in the media, has reportedly called on the government to help out the media sector.

"We've closed over 200 local newspapers in Canada so there has to be a mechanism in which to fund them. There needs to be some dramatic changes," Unifor president Jerry Dias reportedly said earlier this month.

And News Media Canada, an industry association representing roughly 800 daily, community and weekly newspapers, has also reportedly called on Ottawa to pony up $350 million for a Canadian Journalism Fund.

Finance Minister Bill Morneau claimed in a speech in the House of Commons on Wednesday that the government's plan will strengthen the country's journalism sector.

"To protect the vital role that independent news media play in our democracy and in our communities, we will be introducing measures to help support journalism in Canada," said Morneau.

Under the Liberal government's proposed media bailout plan, it would create "an independent panel of journalists" that will purportedly define what "professional journalism" is and determine who is eligible for the government tax breaks for the production of original news.

The independence of that panel of journalists is already being questioned.

Spencer Fernando, who publishes a Canadian news website of the same name, agrees.

"The big problem is that, beyond the waste of taxpayer dollars, the government will be picking which media companies end up getting bailed out," wrote Fernando.

"The Trudeau Liberals are trying to hide the true nature of the program by saying it will be ‘independent’ from political interference, but everybody who understands life knows that’s a total joke," he wrote. "Whoever picks the ‘independent panel’ has the power, and it’s easy to pick people who will do exactly what you want them to do."

On Twitter, the Conservative Member of Parliament for the riding of Carleton, Pierre Poilievre, chided the prime minister Wednesday, suggesting the Liberal leader would demand each news media sign a "values attestation."

That was a reference to the political fiasco Ottawa unleashed earlier this year when it demanded employers hoping to get Canada Summer Jobs Grants to hire summer students sign such a values attestation, essentially stating they support abortion, transgenderism and homosexuality. Many employers, including Christian churches and organizations, refused to sign and lost out on that funding.

Planned Parenthood-affiliated organizations in Canada, though, did get funded to the tune of more than $88,000 through the Canada Summer Jobs Grant program last summer.

The government's plan to bail out the media industry includes a refundable tax credit on the labour costs of qualifying news outlets whether they are non-profits or for-profit companies. Ottawa is also planning to allow for tax receipts to be issued to people who give to qualifying non-profit news organizations. Online news media outlets deemed eligible will also enjoy, at least temporarily, a non-refundable, 15-per-cent tax credit for qualifying subscribers.

Those measures are expected to cost Ottawa $595 million over the next five years, with more details promised in the 2019 federal budget.

In addition to this, the Liberal government is also planning to plunk down $14.6 million over the next five years to create a digital, francophone platform with TV5Monde.


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Post by vet1 on Fri 23 Nov 2018, 12:22 pm

Thanks for posting it. Rebelmedia and Lifesitenews became my go to place for real news. Especially after some convicted pedophile tried to shot down Lifesitenews couple of months ago.
The other 11 (whatever they are) never read and will not influence my voting.
Thanks again.

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Post by Powergunner on Wed 19 Dec 2018, 1:06 pm

Trudeau sees 2019 election as choice between positive Liberals, divisive Tories

The Canadian Press
Published: Dec 19, 2018

OTTAWA — Justin Trudeau says he's confident he'll win re-election next fall by sticking to a positive, thoughtful approach to difficult issues, in contrast to the Conservatives whom he accuses of resorting to bumper sticker slogans that prey on voters' fears and prejudices.

Although recent provincial elections suggest Canada is not immune to the anti-immigrant sentiment or nationalist populist sloganeering that has swept through the U.S. and other countries around the globe, the prime minister argues that Canadians are getting wise to political leaders who promise easy, simplistic solutions to complex issues.

"I think one of the big distinctions that we see around the world right now is folks who want to exacerbate, amplify and exaggerate those fears for short-term political gain versus those who are trying to thoughtfully allay those fears," Trudeau said in a year-end roundtable with the Ottawa bureau of The Canadian Press.

"Obviously, it's easier to spook someone than it is to explain a complex answer," he said. "But I fundamentally believe in trusting citizens' capacity to be thoughtful about where we're going ... and that is what I am going to be putting forward as a vision for our politics, for our country and, by extension, I think for the whole world."

In that sense, Trudeau is drawing much the same battle lines that propelled the Liberals to a come-from-behind victory in 2015.

In that campaign, he points out that Stephen Harper's Conservatives adopted a strategy with "Islamaphobic undertones," including vowing to ban Muslim women from wearing the face-covering niqab during citizenship ceremonies and proposing creation of a "snitch line" to tip police to culturally barbaric practices.

By contrast, he said Liberals won by campaigning "on a thoughtful approach that was in total contrast with the versions of populism that were already beginning to creep into global discourse at that point."

Since then, Trudeau acknowledged populism has swept through some European countries and the United States, with the election of President Donald Trump, and right-wing, nationalist forces have become more effective at disseminating messages designed to inflame anxieties and tensions through social media.

Here in Canada, Quebecers elected Francois Legault's Coalition Avenir Quebec on a platform of reducing immigration and banning certain public servants, including teachers, police and judges, from wearing religious symbols.

While those ideas might be "popular at first blush in a populist speech," Trudeau predicted that Quebecers will change their minds once they "actually dig into the real world consequences of allowing and encouraging discrimination based on someone's religion within a free society."

He argued that Canadian have become "more aware of the dangers of populism, the consequences of populism."

As proof, Trudeau pointed to the growing disenchantment of Ontarians with Progressive Conservative Premier Doug Ford, whose popularity has plunged in just six short months as his fledgling government reels from one controversy to another.

Ford "did certainly promise easy answers to complex questions and seems to be having a certain amount of difficulty in actually moving forward in a way that is actually saving people money," said Trudeau.

The same criticism, he argued, can be levelled at Andrew Scheer's federal Conservatives, whom he described as exploiting "wedge issues" — such as spreading deliberate "disingenuous misinformation" about the recent United Nations compact on migration — while "doubling down" on the same policies advanced by Harper on everything from the economy, to international affairs to Indigenous reconciliation.

He dismissed suggestions that he's indulging in fear tactics or smears of his own when he equates Scheer with Harper.

"We had this discussion quite a bit during the 2015 election where my emphasis on sunny ways had people going, 'Aha!' any time I'd say something critical of Stephen Harper," he said.

"I'm always going to be very, very sharp any time there are clear distinctions in policy, in approach, in the way someone indicates their tendency to perhaps divide Canadians or exploit faultlines rather than pulling together.

"I will make no apologies for being very passionate, sometimes overly enthusiastic, in the way I engage in a robust debate. But I am, as much as possible, going to keep it on a substantive level."

He argued that it's perfectly fair and factual, for instance, to point out that Scheer has no plan to tackle climate change, other than opposing the Liberals' carbon tax, which goes into effect next year.

"There's lots of important debates to be had on ... how the best way to fight climate change is. But they still seem stuck on whether to fight climate change and I don't think Canadians are there, but certainly that's where Harper was and that seems to be where they still are."

Joan Bryden, The Canadian Press


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Post by vet1 on Wed 19 Dec 2018, 1:38 pm

Now, that the libturds bought libturd media with substantial $$ (mind you, they were always on libturd payrall), one may expect that according to them (the libtuds media), the libturd party will always be 'ahead' in polls and vote counts till the last minute.

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Post by Trooper on Wed 19 Dec 2018, 6:11 pm

Powergunner wrote:
Trudeau sees 2019 election as choice between positive Liberals, divisive Tories

The Canadian Press
Published: Dec 19, 2018

OTTAWA — Justin Trudeau says he's confident he'll win re-election next fall by sticking to a positive, thoughtful approach to difficult issues, in contrast to the Conservatives whom he accuses of resorting to bumper sticker slogans that prey on voters' fears and prejudices.

Although recent provincial elections suggest Canada is not immune to the anti-immigrant sentiment or nationalist populist sloganeering that has swept through the U.S. and other countries around the globe, the prime minister argues that Canadians are getting wise to political leaders who promise easy, simplistic solutions to complex issues.

"I think one of the big distinctions that we see around the world right now is folks who want to exacerbate, amplify and exaggerate those fears for short-term political gain versus those who are trying to thoughtfully allay those fears," Trudeau said in a year-end roundtable with the Ottawa bureau of The Canadian Press.

"Obviously, it's easier to spook someone than it is to explain a complex answer," he said. "But I fundamentally believe in trusting citizens' capacity to be thoughtful about where we're going ... and that is what I am going to be putting forward as a vision for our politics, for our country and, by extension, I think for the whole world."

In that sense, Trudeau is drawing much the same battle lines that propelled the Liberals to a come-from-behind victory in 2015.

In that campaign, he points out that Stephen Harper's Conservatives adopted a strategy with "Islamaphobic undertones," including vowing to ban Muslim women from wearing the face-covering niqab during citizenship ceremonies and proposing creation of a "snitch line" to tip police to culturally barbaric practices.

By contrast, he said Liberals won by campaigning "on a thoughtful approach that was in total contrast with the versions of populism that were already beginning to creep into global discourse at that point."

Since then, Trudeau acknowledged populism has swept through some European countries and the United States, with the election of President Donald Trump, and right-wing, nationalist forces have become more effective at disseminating messages designed to inflame anxieties and tensions through social media.

Here in Canada, Quebecers elected Francois Legault's Coalition Avenir Quebec on a platform of reducing immigration and banning certain public servants, including teachers, police and judges, from wearing religious symbols.

While those ideas might be "popular at first blush in a populist speech," Trudeau predicted that Quebecers will change their minds once they "actually dig into the real world consequences of allowing and encouraging discrimination based on someone's religion within a free society."

He argued that Canadian have become "more aware of the dangers of populism, the consequences of populism."

As proof, Trudeau pointed to the growing disenchantment of Ontarians with Progressive Conservative Premier Doug Ford, whose popularity has plunged in just six short months as his fledgling government reels from one controversy to another.

Ford "did certainly promise easy answers to complex questions and seems to be having a certain amount of difficulty in actually moving forward in a way that is actually saving people money," said Trudeau.

The same criticism, he argued, can be levelled at Andrew Scheer's federal Conservatives, whom he described as exploiting "wedge issues" — such as spreading deliberate "disingenuous misinformation" about the recent United Nations compact on migration — while "doubling down" on the same policies advanced by Harper on everything from the economy, to international affairs to Indigenous reconciliation.

He dismissed suggestions that he's indulging in fear tactics or smears of his own when he equates Scheer with Harper.

"We had this discussion quite a bit during the 2015 election where my emphasis on sunny ways had people going, 'Aha!' any time I'd say something critical of Stephen Harper," he said.

"I'm always going to be very, very sharp any time there are clear distinctions in policy, in approach, in the way someone indicates their tendency to perhaps divide Canadians or exploit faultlines rather than pulling together.

"I will make no apologies for being very passionate, sometimes overly enthusiastic, in the way I engage in a robust debate. But I am, as much as possible, going to keep it on a substantive level."

He argued that it's perfectly fair and factual, for instance, to point out that Scheer has no plan to tackle climate change, other than opposing the Liberals' carbon tax, which goes into effect next year.

"There's lots of important debates to be had on ... how the best way to fight climate change is. But they still seem stuck on whether to fight climate change  and I don't think Canadians are there, but certainly that's where Harper was and that seems to be where they still are."

Joan Bryden, The Canadian Press



Don't like Scheer, even more dislike for Trudeau. Have to go with Scheer come election time simply because Trudeau has done enough damage to this Country. Regarding the Veterans file, no party will bring this file par with the pension act. So I write them all off. For the Country, God help us all if Trudeau gets re-elected!
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Post by bosn181 on Wed 19 Dec 2018, 6:47 pm

trooper are you sure he has done enough damage i am sure there is still someone left that he needs to say sorry to lol. i mean come on he has bent Canada over and gave it to us pretty hard but i am sure there may be one or two groups that he needs to chum up to for support. Sad if he does get in maybe we can cross the southern boarder and claim asylum.

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Post by Hammercore on Fri 21 Dec 2018, 6:55 am

Slipping ratings

Dec 21, 2018

2019 Federal Election TG-A02-10082018-PM_20180810110549_2_large

Political polls have come a long way from being infrequent snapshots of a specific period in time. In this age of modern analytics, they hold considerable sway in gauging the mood of the public. Trending poll numbers can now result in resignations and demands for change — starting at the top. Polling is non-stop and nothing is left to chance.

A recent Angus Reid poll ranked the recognition factor and performances of federal cabinet ministers in Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s inner circle. The holiday message for prominent Atlantic Canadian cabinet ministers is far from positive and should provide much to ponder over the holidays.

A federal election will be held in October. That date seems solid following comments from the PM that he has no intention of going to the polls earlier. Polling suggests that Trudeau is slipping in terms of performance and leader preference.

The PM’s numbers are slipping and so are those of his supporting cast. Polling numbers suggest Atlantic cabinet ministers are increasingly vulnerable and the election will be more interesting than believed, even a few short months ago.

Consider Veteran Affairs Minister Seamus O’Regan. The Newfoundland and Labrador MP is among the most recognized cabinet ministers, thanks to his previous career as a national television host. But his ratings are falling, largely because of recurring problems within his department.

Polling numbers suggest Atlantic cabinet ministers are increasingly vulnerable and the election will be more interesting than believed, even a few short months ago.

Try as he might to change policy, he admits there is a mindset inside the department which prefers to say no rather than yes to veterans and their concerns. The delays in dealing with wait times for veterans’ benefits have shifted seamlessly from Conservative to Liberal governments

Then there is Agriculture Minister Lawrence MacAulay from P.E.I. He was flying below the radar in cabinet for two years, but his recognition factor shot up in 2018, thanks to NAFTA negotiations and the concessions made by Canada in supply management with dairy, poultry and eggs. Farmers and others were outraged, and MacAulay’s recognition factor skyrocketed, while his performance ratings plummeted.

New Brunswick MP Dominic LeBlanc, a close friend of Trudeau’s, was considered untouchable until Canada’s ethics commissioner ruled he broke conflict of interest rules in awarding a lucrative clam fishing licence to a company connected to his family. His recognition value remains high but his performance rating crashed.

Nova Scotia’s Scott Brison has a high recognition factor but his performance rating also dropped, for no obvious reason, except perhaps guilt by association, although the Phoenix pay system boondoggle is finding a home at his doorstep.

The poll reflects general declining support for Trudeau and his Liberal government. The numbers are worse outside Atlantic Canada but are growing in this region as well.

High recognition numbers are usually considered an asset. With Trudeau’s Atlantic ministers, it’s an increasing liability, as the region connects failures to names and faces.

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Post by Viper on Fri 21 Dec 2018, 5:31 pm

No letup for Trudeau as difficult 2018 gives way to wild election year

2019 Federal Election Image

Joan Bryden, The Canadian Press
Published Friday, December 21, 2018

OTTAWA -- Fasten your seatbelt, Canada. It's going to be a bumpy ride to next fall's national election.

The past year has been a turbulent one on the Canadian political scene and the coming year is bound to get that much more tumultuous as politicians prepare for what both Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer have predicted will be a nasty campaign.

Think of the first six months of 2019 as the semi-finals, with party leaders jostling for position, test-driving their messages and refining their trash talk at opposing teams. The finals will begin when Parliament breaks at the end of June, even though the writ won't officially drop until Sept. 1, at the earliest, for the vote scheduled on Oct. 21.


Trudeau's Liberals and Scheer's Conservatives are the main competitors as they head into playoff season; the NDP, Greens and Maxime Bernier's breakaway People's Party are bit players but potentially positioned as spoilers who will determine which of the two leading contenders walks off with the prize.

But if the past year is any measure, there will doubtless be numerous twists and turns.

For Trudeau, 2018 started with a disastrous trip to India that resulted in a slump in popularity from which he and the Liberals never seemed to fully recover. Despite a relatively robust economy, the lowest jobless numbers in 40 years and managing to navigate roller-coaster negotiations to renew the North American Free Trade Agreement, Trudeau has been beset by events that have interrupted his good-news narrative.

There was mercurial U.S. President Donald Trump slapping tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum and calling Trudeau "weak" and "dishonest" when he spoke out against them.

There was the continuing tide of asylum seekers crossing into Canada at unofficial border crossings.

And there was the court ruling that shut down work on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project the Liberals paid $4.5 billion to buy. The ruling knocked down one pillar of Trudeau's signature promise to tackle climate change by balancing economic growth and environmental protection.


And it shook the other pillar -- imposing a price on carbon, starting in April -- at a time when some of Trudeau's most reliable provincial Liberal allies on climate change were being replaced by fierce conservative opponents --Doug Ford in Ontario and Blaine Higgs in New Brunswick, who promptly joined Saskatchewan's Scott Moe in challenging the constitutionality of Trudeau's carbon tax, along with Manitoba's Brian Pallister.

The pipeline issue has produced angry protests in Alberta, where talk about separating from Canada has been revived, fuelled in part by Quebec Premier Francois Legault's dismissal of another pipeline to ship Alberta's "dirty energy" to eastern Canada.

After enduring a summer diplomatic meltdown by Saudi Arabia over a Global Affairs tweet, Trudeau is now ending the year in a bitter dispute with China over Canada's arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou at the behest of the United States. China has detained Canadians in apparent retaliation.

While Trudeau insists there was no political interference and Canada is simply abiding by the rule of law, Trump has once again complicated his life by implying Meng's arrest was a ploy to gain leverage in trade talks with China.

For all that, pollster David Coletto says Trudeau retains considerable goodwill with voters as he heads into an election year. But an economic slump would undermine Trudeau's contention that his government has chosen the right path by running up steep annual deficits to invest in things that spur economic growth. The Liberals' failure to even set a date for a return to balanced budgets, contrary to their 2015 platform promise to do so by 2019, is already among Canadians' top worries and No. 1 on Scheer's hit list.

There's no telling what else could happen, particularly with the unpredictable Trump next door.

"For me, the big theme is do the Liberals look like they're in control of what's happening?" says Coletto, CEO of Abacus Data.

"I think their greatest weakness or liability is the sense that they've lost control over the budget, over the relationship with China, the relationship with Trump, questions around affordability ... You can imagine the narrative being developed by the Conservatives to say that this prime minister has just lost control, that he can't manage the complex world we live in," he adds.

"It hasn't fully happened yet but you can imagine that's a broader issue that's driven by smaller ones happening across the board that builds into a perfect storm that I think is very damaging to the Liberals politically."

Indeed, Scheer appears to have already adopted the "out-of-control" narrative, dubbing 2018 "a year of failure for Justin Trudeau" on virtually every front.

The risk in that approach, however, is that it will strike Canadians as overly simplistic and negative, particularly if Scheer is unable to convince them that he would be able to control the situation. Moreover, Coletto says Trudeau is shielded from such attacks -- at least for now -- by the fact that there remains a sizeable number of Canadians who still believe he has the country's best interests at heart and is doing his best in complicated circumstances.

While the two leading contenders duke it out, developments among the other parties could be crucial to the outcome of the election, starting with an early February byelection in B.C.'s Burnaby South, where NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh hopes to turn around his party's flagging fortunes by winning a seat in the House of Commons.

The Liberals, who benefit when the NDP is lacklustre, are hoping Singh wins; they don't want New Democrats to dump him before the election and potentially choose a more appealing leader who could siphon off progressive votes. Conservatives, who win when the centre-left vote is split, are equally fervent in hoping the NDP can get its act together by Oct. 21.

Coletto believes it's too early to write Singh off, assuming he can win the byelection, or the NDP, regardless of its leadership. His research suggests that just under 10 per cent of Canadians who back a specific party today say they're very likely to change their minds between now and the election.

"The real fluidity is on the left side of the spectrum, it's the Liberals and New Democrats and Greens and where those voters -- more of them voted Liberal last time but some of them have now left that red tent -- where do they end up? So I think there is a potential volatility," Coletto says.

By contrast, he says, "The Conservative vote is much more solid."

Which is not to say the Conservatives won't face their own potential for vote splitting. Bernier's upstart People's Party has thus far not made much of a dent in Tory support but Coletto notes it doesn't have to win any seats to have an impact. If it siphons off just one percentage point of votes from the Conservatives, it could help Liberals win in close-fought ridings and make the difference between a minority or majority government.

Moreover, Coletto says Bernier, who prides himself on his willingness to take politically dangerous stances on things like supply management, immigration and multiculturalism, may force Scheer to go further down those roads than he'd like -- or than mainstream Canadians are comfortable with -- to protect his right flank.

Which would likely suit Trudeau just fine. He's already trying to frame the election as a choice between positive Liberals who try to bring Canadians together and divisive Conservatives who prey on Canadians' fears and prejudices.

It's essentially a replay of one of the major themes of the 2015 campaign and one Coletto says might actually have more resonance now as the vast majority of Canadians recoil in horror from Trump's angry, divisive style of politics. If so, Trudeau might finally have a reason to thank Trump.


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Post by RevForce on Sat 22 Dec 2018, 2:37 pm

Trudeau blunders will sink one-term wonder boy

ANDRE MARIN December 22, 2018



2019 Federal Election Cs20181122jw020-e1544045050742


When it comes to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, the bloom left the peach some time ago. That is to say that voters don’t see him with the same glow as before.

The youthful Trudeau, who’s meagre credentials include part-time drama teacher, pulled off an admirable victory in the last election, pulling his party from third place to first place.

Carefully planned photo ops of yoga poses at work, showing off his tattoos, crashing weddings, running topless through city streets and smiling broadly for the cameras promising “sunny ways” was all it took apparently. He also promised deficits, which I thought would sink him.



2019 Federal Election Trudeau


But no – he prevailed through sheer charisma and by contrasting himself to former Prime Minister Stephen Harper, who many Canadians had grown to view as a dull and angry man.

A new Angus Reid Institute survey has some sobering news for our flash-in-the-plan PM. Trudeau’s approval rating is net negative 23% (just 35% approve; 58% disapprove).

In Trudeau’s magical world of wonders, all you have to do is look good and incessantly pursue ideological gender-based ideas. The deficit? Don’t worry about it. It’ll balance itself – which we know is pure lunacy. It’s now many times larger than he promised. In the event of the predicted economic downturn in the year to come, where is our landing cushion? We have none.

Trudeau has made plenty of rookie mistakes since assuming office.





First, when asked why Canada had not been more vocal in obtaining the release of three Canadians being detained by the Chinese, his naive response was telling: “I remember standing in the House and challenging Mr. Harper to pick up the phone and get this Canadian released. Sometimes, politicizing or amplifying the level of public discourse may be satisfying in the short term but does not contribute to the outcome we all want, which is for Canadians to be safe and secure.”

Trudeau being “political?” Who knew?

It wasn’t too long ago the Chinese affectionately nicknamed him “little potato.” Well, negotiating for the release of three captive Canadians is, as Trudeau recently found out, big potatoes.

Second, he surrounded himself with a weak cabinet. Minister of the Environment Catherine McKenna, who many pundits and opposing politicians perhaps inappropriately nicknamed “climate Barbie” has come across both as sanctimonious and shallow.

Mélanie Joly, Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie is competing with Veterans Affairs Minister Seamus O’Regan for being the most incompetent minister.

Joly has jumped from one blunder to another. How can one justify spending $5.6 million on a 25-day Parliament Hill rink to cap off the Canada 150 celebrations?





In reality, she’s the runner-up for worst cabinet minister. The winner has to be ethically-challenged Veterans Affairs Minister Seamus O’Regan nicknamed “Shameless O’Regan” by veteran journalist Robert Fife and others who add he was the “most incompetent” minister in cabinet. He’s accused of not understanding how his department works.

O’Regan also attacked well-respected veterans advocate Sean Bruyea for defamation for insinuating that he was a “liar” who “was deliberately untruthful to serve some dishonest personal agenda.” Bruyea sued and lost and is now appealing the decision.

Finally, O’Regan had the gall to compare leaving his job at CTV news where he was provided an allowance for Canali suits at Harry’s to soldiers being discharged from the army. Canali suits go for about $2,000 each. Did leaving them behind cause him PTSD? It shows how out of touch he is. A completely insensitive and just plain dumb comment.

In his year-end interviews, Trudeau maintained it was all business as usual heading into the October 2019 election, meaning what you see is what you get and will keep getting. It’s a sure recipe for a one-term government, about to become third party once again. You read it here first.


Follow Andre Marin at @ont_andremarin




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Post by Silveray_88 on Fri 28 Dec 2018, 4:57 pm

‘Feeling the pinch’: MP expects carbon tax, rising prices to be top election issues

Dec 28, 2018

2019 Federal Election Jc%2010%20gallant_Super_Portrait

The 2019 federal election is gearing up to be a battle over the carbon tax, says Renfrew-Nipissing-Pembroke MP Cheryl Gallant.

In a year-end interview with Metroland Media, Gallant said that she will also raise as election issues immigration, the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) rate hikes’ effect on job creation, delays in veterans’ benefits and the Liberals’ attempted revival of gun control.

Looking back on 2018, Gallant said she is particularly pleased with important strides made by Garrison Petawawa and Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL); both are major economic generators for the riding and are playing key roles in Canada’s security and scientific innovation, she said.

She noted that CNL is working on some “exciting new programs,” including a possible cure for cancer.

Despite her party’s recent rise in the polls, Gallant said she’s taking nothing for granted when it comes to the Oct. 21 election, particularly since the Conservatives are at a “huge disadvantage” because of the $595 million the Liberal government has promised in incentives and tax breaks for the media. However, “it’s too little too late” for the media in the Upper Ottawa Valley, as jobs have already been lost here, she said.

Gallant said that if elected, the Conservatives will repeal the carbon tax being imposed by the federal Liberals against the wishes of most of the provinces. “It’s just another consumption tax … and it’s the people who will feel the pinch” despite the rebate, she said.

She said that the tax will boost fuel prices, especially that of diesel — meaning truckers will have to raise their prices. That will make many items more expensive, hurting the economy already affected by the U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum, she said.

Increasing taxes is not the way to fix environmental problems, she said.

Gallant said the United Nations is “ramping up the fear factor” when it comes to climate change, and charged that politicians are silencing scientists who disagree with the fashionable view; when governments focus entirely on one cause for climate change, there is a danger that other factors may be overlooked, she said.

“Scientists should always be encouraged to ask questions” instead of bowing to the whims of politicians, she said.


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