2019 Federal Election

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Re: 2019 Federal Election

Post by Mullberry on Fri 28 Dec 2018, 6:44 pm

This was the year things came undone for Trudeau

Candice Malcolm
Published:
December 28, 2018





This was a very bad year for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. 2018 got off to a rocky start, and everything went downhill from there.

In early January, news broke that the federal ethics commissioner had found Trudeau guilty of breaking conflict of interest laws by going on a free vacation to a billionaire’s private island.

Trudeau become the first PM in history to be found guilty of breaking Canada’s ethics laws. His handlers quickly sent him on a cross-country speaking tour to distract from the bad headlines. But that only made things worse.

Trudeau insulted a young Canadian soldier who had lost his leg in Afghanistan, telling him that veterans were “asking for more than we are able to give right now.”

Trudeau’s indifference to suffering war heroes was eclipsed only by his absurd deference to political correctness. During the same town hall meeting, Trudeau corrected a young woman for using the term “mankind,” telling her instead, “we like to say peoplekind.”

Things went from bad to worse for Trudeau in February when he embarked on a junket to India. It was supposed to be Trudeau’s time to shine; the international press were known to swoon over Canada’s hip and progressive leader.

Instead, everything that could possibly go wrong went wrong. It was a disaster of epic proportions.

Trudeau looked like a fool, dressed up like a Bollywood show-off, dancing at press conferences and dragging his poor family from one ridiculous photo op to another. His eight-day agenda lacked any real diplomatic purpose, and he was snubbed by Indian government officials over accusations of pandering to Sikh extremists in Canada.

Lo and behold, as I first reported in the Sun, one of those Sikh extremists was convicted would-be killer Jaspal Atwal, who was in India with the Canadian delegation and photographed at an official event.

Trudeau’s incompetence was amplified, and his office’s cover-up — blaming the invitation on “rogue elements” in the Indian government — made it all so much worse.

Trudeau was exposed, shamelessly pandering to actual terrorists and lacking the self-awareness to step out of the spotlight after being lambasted and ridiculed by the same international media that once praised him.

From there, we learned that Trudeau the feminist had once been accused of accosting a young female reporter at a music festival back in the year 2000 when he was 28.

“Men and women experience things differently,” said Trudeau, denying any wrongdoing. His “feminism” suddenly seemed hollow and hypocritical.





Trudeau always puts style over substance, and while his style repeatedly backfired in 2018, the substance was even worse.

After promising modest deficits, Trudeau’s spending spiralled out of control with no plan to get back to balance.

His refusal to secure our borders led to a crisis of illegal migration, the highest asylum claimant numbers in history and the lowest public approval of immigration in decades.

Trudeau was nearly blocked out of NAFTA for his arrogance, and he failed to secure a deal to protect Canadian manufacturing jobs.

And his anti-energy agenda – carbon taxes, tanker bans, cancelled pipelines and Bill C-69 — have pushed many Albertans to the brink of separatism.

The country is divided, people are angry, and Trudeau’s approval rating has never been lower.

A sizable majority — 58% of Canadians — disapprove of Justin Trudeau, 38% saying they “strongly disapprove.”

2018 was the year the shine came off of our prime minister. Canadians saw more of Trudeau, and they really didn’t like what they saw.







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Re: 2019 Federal Election

Post by Gridlock on Sun 30 Dec 2018, 7:42 pm

2018 a dud for Trudeau



Published:
December 30, 2018

https://torontosun.com/news/national/lilley-2018-a-dud-for-trudeau
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Re: 2019 Federal Election

Post by Kizzer on Wed 02 Jan 2019, 9:03 am

Campaign preview: Scheer pledges to dismantle carbon tax




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Re: 2019 Federal Election

Post by Charlie on Fri 04 Jan 2019, 7:26 am

Mullberry wrote:
This was the year things came undone for Trudeau

Candice Malcolm
Published:
December 28, 2018





This was a very bad year for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. 2018 got off to a rocky start, and everything went downhill from there.

In early January, news broke that the federal ethics commissioner had found Trudeau guilty of breaking conflict of interest laws by going on a free vacation to a billionaire’s private island.

Trudeau become the first PM in history to be found guilty of breaking Canada’s ethics laws. His handlers quickly sent him on a cross-country speaking tour to distract from the bad headlines. But that only made things worse.

Trudeau insulted a young Canadian soldier who had lost his leg in Afghanistan, telling him that veterans were “asking for more than we are able to give right now.”

Trudeau’s indifference to suffering war heroes was eclipsed only by his absurd deference to political correctness. During the same town hall meeting, Trudeau corrected a young woman for using the term “mankind,” telling her instead, “we like to say peoplekind.”

Things went from bad to worse for Trudeau in February when he embarked on a junket to India. It was supposed to be Trudeau’s time to shine; the international press were known to swoon over Canada’s hip and progressive leader.

Instead, everything that could possibly go wrong went wrong. It was a disaster of epic proportions.

Trudeau looked like a fool, dressed up like a Bollywood show-off, dancing at press conferences and dragging his poor family from one ridiculous photo op to another. His eight-day agenda lacked any real diplomatic purpose, and he was snubbed by Indian government officials over accusations of pandering to Sikh extremists in Canada.

Lo and behold, as I first reported in the Sun, one of those Sikh extremists was convicted would-be killer Jaspal Atwal, who was in India with the Canadian delegation and photographed at an official event.

Trudeau’s incompetence was amplified, and his office’s cover-up — blaming the invitation on “rogue elements” in the Indian government — made it all so much worse.

Trudeau was exposed, shamelessly pandering to actual terrorists and lacking the self-awareness to step out of the spotlight after being lambasted and ridiculed by the same international media that once praised him.

From there, we learned that Trudeau the feminist had once been accused of accosting a young female reporter at a music festival back in the year 2000 when he was 28.

“Men and women experience things differently,” said Trudeau, denying any wrongdoing. His “feminism” suddenly seemed hollow and hypocritical.





Trudeau always puts style over substance, and while his style repeatedly backfired in 2018, the substance was even worse.

After promising modest deficits, Trudeau’s spending spiralled out of control with no plan to get back to balance.

His refusal to secure our borders led to a crisis of illegal migration, the highest asylum claimant numbers in history and the lowest public approval of immigration in decades.

Trudeau was nearly blocked out of NAFTA for his arrogance, and he failed to secure a deal to protect Canadian manufacturing jobs.

And his anti-energy agenda – carbon taxes, tanker bans, cancelled pipelines and Bill C-69 — have pushed many Albertans to the brink of separatism.

The country is divided, people are angry, and Trudeau’s approval rating has never been lower.

A sizable majority — 58% of Canadians — disapprove of Justin Trudeau, 38% saying they “strongly disapprove.”

2018 was the year the shine came off of our prime minister. Canadians saw more of Trudeau, and they really didn’t like what they saw.







You Said It: 2019 the time for Trudeau to go

Published:
January 4, 2019





2019 THE TIME FOR TRUDEAU TO GO

Re: This was the year things came undone for Trudeau, Dec. 29

Kudos to Candice Malcolm for her column on Dec. 29 regarding her review of 2018 in which she details PM Trudeau’s year of follies! The continuing narcissistic actions by Trudeau — he recently stated that he expects to win re-election in 2019 — shows again his arrogance, and I can only hope this will be his last year as the so-called leader of Canada.

We can’t afford another four years of his careless mismanagement of our economy with apparently no concerns about our deficit/debt, which he increases daily, and his love for screwing Canadians with more taxes, including the soon-to-be implemented carbon tax.

Recent polls showing that Trudeau’s popularity is at a three-year low is great news and hopefully his “Sunny Days” are coming to a close with Canadian “peoplekind” giving him the boot next October.

LINDSAY HEPBURN

KANATA


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Re: 2019 Federal Election

Post by Colter on Tue 08 Jan 2019, 10:10 am

Jan 7, 2019 > Power Play: Candidates and fundraising

Maxime Bernier, the People's Party of Canada leader, shares what's ahead for the party.




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Re: 2019 Federal Election

Post by Viper on Fri 25 Jan 2019, 7:45 pm

The battle for 2019 has already begun: Conservatives gearing up for election

THE CANADIAN PRESS January 25, 2019


OTTAWA — Canada’s Conservatives are unapologetically in election campaign mode as they gather in Ottawa for a three-day caucus retreat this weekend.

The MPs and Senators have gathered in part to prepare for the reopening of Parliament next week after the lengthy Christmas break, but it is Oct. 21 — election day — that is getting most of their attention.

The weekend event, which kicked off Friday, will feature a number of activities and discussions about campaign strategy and preparedness.

Many of the 110 candidates who have been elected in ridings not currently held by Conservatives will attend special “victory school” campaign training alongside MPs and take part in discussions about how to rally support from Canadians.

The party is sharpening its message to Canadians to convince them the Conservatives are ready to topple the Trudeau government.

“(Our priority) is going to be talking about Canadian families and Canadian families’ affordability today, the fact that they are feeling the pinch, because that’s what we’re being told in our ridings,” Conservative deputy leader Lisa Raitt told reporters as the retreat was getting underway Friday.

She said the Conservatives want Canadians to understand that leader Andrew Scheer and the Conservative Party understand the struggles of ordinary Canadians who don’t have an “infinite pot of money” from which to draw.

“That will become very apparent in the way that we’ll be asking questions in the House of Commons,” she said.

On Thursday, the party announced its preliminary fundraising results for the final quarter of 2018 at $7.3 million, bringing the total amount raised in 2018 to $24 million. Tory officials say they have never raised this much in a non-election year.

Last year also saw a record number of donors with over 49,000 Canadians donating an average of $148 for the year, according to the party. Official fundraising results have not yet been released by Elections Canada, so fourth quarter donations for other parties are not yet available for comparison.

While Conservatives are celebrating their war chest success, they are not wasting any time continuing to build the party’s coffers in preparation for the official writ drop.

“The battle for 2019 has already begun” declared an email blast to members ahead of the retreat .The email challenged party donors to raise $50,000 by the end of the weekend as a way to thumb their nose at “special interest groups” such as union bosses, and “U.S. funded anti-development organizations” the party claims are planning a smear campaign against Scheer during the election.

Meanwhile, Scheer has been on the road holding town halls, which are open to the public and media and have been live-streamed on social media.

The crowds have largely been friendly faces — party faithful who like to hear jabs at Trudeau’s expense and often take a few of their own. Scheer has faced some uncomfortable questions at some of them about his stance against reopening the abortion debate and the former Conservative government’s record on helping veterans.

At a town hall in Edmonton in December Scheer firmly disagreed with one man who asked him to deliver a “Vivre la Alberta libre” sign to Trudeau.

He was also asked whether he feared the new People’s Party of Canada formed by former Conservative MP Maxime Bernier might split the Conservative vote in some ridings, allowing the Liberals to win more seats.

Scheer responded by saying he is confident that “everyone to the right of Justin Trudeau” will see the Conservative party has the best chance of defeating the Liberals.

“We have an opportunity to defeat Justin Trudeau and that is what is at stake,” Scheer replied.

“I am convinced that the people who may, at one point or another, have been contemplating or looking at what that other party might provide are seeing that it is our party that not only has a chance to win… but actually has a positive vision for how we can make this country so wonderful and get us back on track.”


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Re: 2019 Federal Election

Post by Bailler on Sun 10 Feb 2019, 9:23 am

N.B. premier predicts electoral trouble for Trudeau in Maritimes over carbon tax


Published Sunday, February 10, 2019

New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs is predicting that Justin Trudeau will be hit with political blowback in the Maritimes if there is a carbon tax in place during the fall election.

During an interview on CTV Question Period, Higgs said his province, more than any other, would be hit the hardest by a federally imposed carbon tax.

"If you look at industries here, you look at the state they’re in environmentally, we're starting from a whole different point of view. I don't have five coal plants to close," Higgs told host Evan Solomon. "We don't need more tax, and that’s the goal."


Higgs has been a vocal opponent of the carbon tax, joining the ranks of premiers in Manitoba, Ontario and Saskatchewan, as well as Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer in their crusade to axe the tax. New Brunswick has also taken on intervener status in the legal challenges Ontario and Saskatchewan launched against the federal government.

Higgs said that if that tax goes ahead, he believes there will be political blowback on Trudeau in his province.

The Liberals swept Atlantic Canada in the 2015 election, winning all 32 seats. However, there are warning signs heading into the 2019 election that a repeat of that wave could be a tall order. One key indicator was the New Brunswick provincial election last September, which saw the Liberal government fall to Higgs' Progressive Conservatives by an exceptionally small margin.

Trudeau has stood behind the carbon tax. He says 90 per cent of the money Ottawa collects from the price on carbon will be returned to Canadians.

The prime minister has also slammed critics of the carbon tax as wanting to "make pollution free again."

Higgs warns of 'negative economic impact'

Higgs doesn’t think the carbon tax will only mean electoral trouble for the Trudeau Liberals. Higgs also believes it will have a "negative economic impact," but stopped short of using the word recession.

Higgs previously told the CBC that he agreed with a statement made by Ontario Premier Doug Ford. Last month, Ford said: "I'm here today to ring the warning bell that the risk of a carbon tax recession is very, very real."

"I was asked if it was going to have a negative economic impact on our province, and I appreciate what Premier Ford said about the impact it's going to have in Ontario and I absolutely agree, it’s going to have a negative impact on our province," Higgs told Solomon.

Multiple economists have pushed back on Ford’s claim that the carbon tax could trigger a recession. In response to the pushback, Ford’s staff cited a Conference Board of Canada study to back up the recession claim.

But Robyn Gibbard, one of the authors of that study, disputed the claim in a Twitter post.

"At no point in our research paper do we say that the carbon tax could cause a recession. We specifically describe the overall economic impact as 'small,'" he said.

Other provinces have also had carbon pricing plans in place for some time without economic catastrophe. British Columbia, for example, has had a price on carbon for 10 years and leads the country in terms of economic growth.





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Re: 2019 Federal Election

Post by Spider on Tue 12 Feb 2019, 7:26 am

Federal Conservative leader looking to break Liberal hold on New Brunswick

Feb 11, 2019

FREDERICTON — Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer is on a campaign-style swing through New Brunswick as the party seeks to make gains in a province and region where it was shut out last time.


FREDERICTON — Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer is on a campaign-style swing through New Brunswick as the party seeks to make gains in a province and region where it was shut out last time.

The Liberals captured all 32 House of Commons seats in Atlantic Canada during the 2015 election, including 10 in New Brunswick.

"There's a real sense that although the Liberals went 32 for 32 in the last election, that the people of Atlantic Canada have gone zero for 32 since then," Scheer said Monday in Fredericton.

Scheer held a town hall meeting Monday evening in the city and drew loud cheers from a large crowd when he said there are about seven months until Canadians get an opportunity to choose a new government in October.

"I meet more and more people who tell me they are tired of paying for Justin Trudeau's mistakes. They are tired of the massive deficits and the runaway spending," he told the crowd. "They know that these massive deficits will mean only one thing, that their taxes will go up."

Scheer took questions on a long list of issues, ranging from help for disabled veterans and people suffering with mental health, to pipelines and interprovincial trade.

He also vowed to axe the federal carbon tax.

"We know that the carbon tax is going to hurt families and working Canadians, small businesses and people who don't have the ability to get a special deal from the government like large industrial emitters got," Scheer said.

Some of the loudest cheers came when Scheer vowed to help small businesses if his party forms a government.

On Tuesday, he is scheduled to speak to a business audience before meeting with Premier Blaine Higgs and his cabinet. He is also holding a policy brainstorming session with Conservatives from across Atlantic Canada. Higgs became the region's lone Tory premier last fall after ousting Liberal Brian Gallant, a close ally of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

At a news conference in Fredericton, Scheer said his party would develop a broad based set of policies to appeal to Canadians across the country.

He also hit on some local hot button issues, including the Energy East pipeline.


"There's a great deal of frustration, especially here in New Brunswick, that the Liberals killed Energy East and that every single Liberal member from the region voted against our motion of support for Energy East," he told reporters.

"Obviously the carbon tax is very unpopular here. People know they are going to pay much more in taxes than they'll get back. It is making life less affordable for the people of New Brunswick."

Donald Wright, a political scientist at the University of New Brunswick, said the Conservatives need to find strong local candidates to ensure they aren't shut out again in Atlantic Canada.

"They can't write off the region as Liberal territory," Wright said.

"Very often these national elections come down to 338 mini-elections."

Wright said Scheer's base is in Western Canada and he will need to raise his profile in the east.

Scheer's visit comes on the heels of recent New Brunswick stops by Trudeau and People's Party Leader Maxime Bernier. Green Leader Elizabeth May will be in the province later this week.

Kevin Bissett, The Canadian Press





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Re: 2019 Federal Election

Post by Silveray_88 on Thu 14 Feb 2019, 2:38 pm

Questions on PM's performance on the world stage: Andrew Coyne on Election 2019

National Post
Published on Feb 14, 2019



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Re: 2019 Federal Election

Post by Zapper-88 on Sat 23 Feb 2019, 8:38 am

SNC-Lavalin is corrupt and not above the law: Maxime Bernier

National Post
Published on Feb 21, 2019



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Re: 2019 Federal Election

Post by bosn181 on Mon 25 Feb 2019, 10:32 am

i say go after SNC shut them down if need be i am sure another company will start up to take there place at the gov feeding table to line there pockets

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Re: 2019 Federal Election

Post by Tazzer on Tue 05 Mar 2019, 2:27 pm

Conservatives take slight lead over Liberals in latest Nanos tracking poll


CTVNews.ca Staff
Published Tuesday, March 5, 2019 12:57PM EST
The Conservatives now have a slight edge over the Liberals, according to the latest Nanos Research federal ballot tracking.

The weekly tracking data, which ended March 1 and was released on Tuesday, shows the Conservatives at 34.7 per cent, followed by the Liberals at 34.2 per cent.

The NDP is at 15.5 per cent and the Green Party at 9.1 per cent. The Bloc Quebecois got 3.6 per cent of the vote, while the People’s Party of Canada got 0.7 per cent.


Asked whether they would consider voting for each of the federal parties, 49.4 per cent of Canadians surveyed said they would consider voting Liberal while 46.3 per cent would consider voting Conservative.

Just over 37 per cent would consider voting NDP, 30.1 per cent would consider voting Green, 9.3 per cent would consider voting for the People’s Party and 21.2 per cent would consider voting for the Bloc Quebecois.

The latest Nanos survey data also show that 52.2 of respondents think Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has the qualities of a good leader, while 39.1 per cent think the same of Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer. Just over 27 per cent think NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh has the qualities of a good leader.

Methodology

Numbers are based on a four-week rolling sample comprised of 1,000 interviews. To update the tracking a new week of 250 interviews is added and the oldest week is dropped.

The margin of error is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points 19 times out of 20.





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Re: 2019 Federal Election

Post by Terrarium on Wed 06 Mar 2019, 7:09 am

The Americas March 5, 2019


Justin Trudeau’s rise to power seemed charmed. Now he faces a fight for his political life.

Jody Wilson-Raybould, left, and Jane Philpott, center, watch as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrives at a news conference in Ottawa on Jan. 14.



Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau rose to power as a press-whispering, selfie-snapping, progressive icon who promised transparency and went viral for promoting women.

But after four years in the spotlight, Trudeau’s government faces accusations of shady brokering and backroom bullying, of sexism and hypocrisy. Though Trudeau has tried to defend his government’s actions, he seems, suddenly, at a loss for words — at least the right ones.

Former members of his cabinet are speaking out. The press is having a field day. Maclean’s, a national magazine, ran a cover with picture of a grinning Trudeau and the words, “The Imposter,” in all caps. Foreign Policy asked whether Canada’s “golden boy” has lost his shine.

The scope of the scandal is such that many Canadians are wondering if he will hold on to his majority government the upcoming election.

Whatever happens, Trudeau’s rock star status seems like a thing of the past.

“The problem is that this particular scandal goes to his carefully crafted image,” said Christopher Sands, director of the Center for Canadian Studies at Johns Hopkins University in Washington.

The crisis shaking Ottawa started as a legal matter but has devolved, over weeks, into a political scandal that touches on a number of hot-button Canadian issues, from the status of Quebec to corporate influence, to indigenous and women’s rights.

At the heart of the scandal are claims that Trudeau’s team pressured Canada’s first indigenous attorney general, Jody Wilson-Raybould, to cut a deal with an engineering firm from Trudeau’s home province, Quebec, and the implication that he demoted her to veterans affairs when she refused.

The company, Montreal-based SNC-Lavalin, was charged by Canadian authorities in 2015 for allegedly using bribes to secure business deals in Moammar Gaddafi-era Libya. The case is ongoing.

It did not make major headlines until last month, when a report in the Globe and Mail claimed that Trudeau’s team “pressed” Wilson-Raybould to cut SNC-Lavalin a deal known as a deferred prosecution agreement.

These agreements, which are used in several countries, allow corporations to avoid criminal convictions in return for admitting wrongdoing, paying a fine and committing to stricter compliance rules.

Trudeau responded to the Globe and Mail report by stating that his team did not “direct” Wilson-Raybould’s decision.

On Feb. 12, Wilson-Raybould resigned from her post as minister of veteran affairs, hiring a high-profile lawyer, but saying little else.

In the political furor that followed, Trudeau’s most powerful aid, Gerald Butts, resigned, saying he did not want accusations against the government to “take one moment away from the vital work the Prime Minister and his office is doing for all Canadians.”

Last week Wilson-Raybould testified that 11 members of Trudeau’s team pressured her, with some resorting to “veiled threats,” to get her to cut a deal.

On Monday, another senior, female member of Trudeau’s team, Jane Philpott, resigned from the cabinet, citing the leader’s handling of the SNC-Lavalin affair.

“It is a fundamental doctrine of the rule of law that our Attorney General should not be subjected to political pressure or interference regarding the exercise of her prosecutorial discretion in criminal cases,” her resignation letter said.

“Sadly, I have lost confidence in how the government has dealt with this matter and in how it has responded to the issues raised.”

On Tuesday, Trudeau appeared to be steering clear of the press. On Wednesday, the prime minister is scheduled to be in private meetings all day.

Trudeau expressed “disappointment” at the news of Philpott’s resignation but has said little else.

Nik Nanos, a Canadian pollster, said it was unusual to see Trudeau’s usually savvy team struggle to reshape the narrative. “They have been on the defensive almost daily,” he said. “We have only really heard one side of the story, plus little snippets from the prime minister.”

That may change. On Wednesday, Butts will deliver testimony, giving the government a chance to lay out what happened on its end.

His challenge, analysts said, will be to defend Trudeau’s handling of the case without appearing to undermine two highly respected women.

If he takes a combative rather than a conciliatory approach, Butts risks alienating the voters who helped Trudeau win office.

Sands said Trudeau’s treatment of Wilson-Raybould, particularly the demotion, made him look like an “angry male boss.”

To survive, he will need to set a new tone, he said. “I think he grovels his way out of it, maybe.”





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Re: 2019 Federal Election

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