Veterans, accountability advocates accuse Team Trudeau of breaking campaign pledge

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Veterans, accountability advocates accuse Team Trudeau of breaking campaign pledge

Post by SniperGod on Tue 13 Mar 2018, 10:21 am

By Kady O'Malley. Published on Mar 13, 2018

A coalition of veterans groups and accountability advocates is set to descend on the precinct this morning to call attention to what they describe as “another failed Liberal campaign promise.”

According to the advisory, representatives from the Veterans Accountability Commission, VeteransVoice.info, Democracy Watch and the Canadian Soldiers Assistance Team will explain why, in their view, the Liberal government “thinks veterans don’t deserve democracy […] nor an education” during a mid-morning appearance on the main stage of the Centre Block press theatre.

The press conference is set to take place just a few hours before Veterans Affairs Minister Seamus O’Regan is scheduled to join visiting Belgian royals King Philippe and Queen Mathilde for a special First World War commemoration ceremony at the Canadian War Museum, with Canadian veterans expected to make up a sizeable portion of the audience.

https://ipolitics.ca/2018/03/13/veterans-accountability-advocates-accuse-team-trudeau-of-breaking-campaign-pledge/
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Re: Veterans, accountability advocates accuse Team Trudeau of breaking campaign pledge

Post by Falcon on Tue 13 Mar 2018, 3:58 pm

Canadian Veterans Advocacy March 13, 2018

Ugh, we were invited to stand with Sean in Ottawa today but adverse health precludes travel.

FYI. Will go facetime live this evening at 8 to discuss.

Media Release
Text of Press Conference
Liberal Government Can’t Afford Veterans and Now Ottawa Thinks Veterans Don’t Deserve Democracy…nor an Education
FOR RELEASE AT 1030a.m. EST,
Tuesday, March 13, 2018
Ottawa: On April 1, 2018, the Trudeau Liberals will implement a number of programs for veterans. We are here because democracy has been manipulated, distorted, and downright ignored so that government can impose half-baked, highly inadequate half-measures that pay lip service to the endless rhetoric about caring for Canada’s veterans and their families.
It is worth emphasizing that all veterans programs have been stickhandled through Parliament over the past 12 years. The programs due to be implemented on April 1, 2018 were quietly hidden in the 2017 budget Omnibus Bill. Not one second of debate was afforded these veterans’ programs. The Veterans Affairs Committee, although directly asked to review the legislation, refused to hold hearings on the programs.
Veterans Affairs Bureaucrats then did what they do best in bamboozling through the regulations, they deceived Parliament, Treasury Board, veterans and the rest of Canada by lying. VAC bureaucrats claim they consulted with the stakeholder committee and the six ad hoc veterans’ advisory groups. They never consulted on any detail of these new programs and then prevented the public, and therefore veterans, from having any input on the regulations.
Veterans Affairs has the audacity to claim in its Treasury Board submission “Given…the absence of major opposition from stakeholders and the general public, it is expected that the regulatory amendments will continue to be well received by CAF members, veterans, families and stakeholder groups.”
Not only can this government not afford veterans, this government apparently believes veterans, who have sacrificed most to preserve democracy, don’t deserve that democracy.
Had democracy been respected we would have learned of more deceptions and shams in the programs themselves.
On Aug 24, 2015, Justin Trudeau while debuting the Liberal campaign platform “Real Change for Veterans” promised “We’ll cover the cost of four years of post-secondary education for every veteran who wants one”.
This education benefit promised to be visionary, akin to a reenergized universal Canadian G.I. Bill. Instead, it is an insult to Canada’s former glory when Canada put over 140,000 WWII veterans through university and trade school training graduating 5,000 teachers, 8,000 engineers, 3,000 doctors, and more than 85,000 veterans in 250 trades
The new program will be so restrictive that only 2000 out of more than 100,000 veterans over a near 20 year period will qualify for “short courses” covering a maximum of $5000. According to the Veterans Affairs submission to Treasury Board, the benefit will pay out only $7 million but cost $12 million to administer over the next 9 years.
For longer courses, veterans must have at least 6 years in the Forces. They can receive up to $80,000 if they have 12 years’ service or more. First Prime Minister Trudeau promised to put $80 million annually into the education benefit, and then Budget 2017 reduced it to $22 million annually over six years. This is enough for a mere 2000 veterans to take college and university programs for those that released from over an 18 year period, from 2006 to 2024.
The final insult, unlike the current US GI Bill, Canada’s few veterans who do qualify will not receive a living allowance but will be taxed on every dollar government puts towards their tuition and living expenses.
Equally disturbing, 500,000 Canadian Forces veterans who released prior to April 1, 2006 are denied this benefit in addition to all of the most disabled and the poorest veterans. Considering the legislation takes on the name the “Veterans Well-Being Act” denying poor and the disabled educational well-being is particularly mean-spirited.
Politicians need to stop expecting veterans will swoon at empty political promises. Canadians may wonder why veterans keep crying foul…it’s because no one in government is listening to veterans, politicians and bureaucrats are listening to their own short-sighted and misinformed advice while democracy is treated with duplicity, and “gratitude to veterans” are merely hollow words.
Veterans deserve far more. Veterans have invested all of themselves so that all Canadians can prosper and live in peace. Canada must invest more into our veterans’ present lives and their futures. Our veterans deserve equal partnership at the democratic and policy table, universal programs for education, transition, and family support as well as a reinstatement of the lifelong Pension Act monthly payments, not scraps and crumbs from capricious campaign promises.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Sean Bruyea
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Re: Veterans, accountability advocates accuse Team Trudeau of breaking campaign pledge

Post by Trooper on Wed 14 Mar 2018, 7:06 am

Veterans say Trudeau Liberals broke promise on education benefit


GLORIA GALLOWAY
OTTAWA
PUBLISHED MARCH 13, 2018


Veterans and their supporters are accusing the federal Liberals of falling far short of a campaign commitment to provide all Canadians who have served in uniform with a university or college education.

The complaint that the new Education and Training Benefit does not match what was promised in the days before the 2015 election comes as veterans groups say the “pensions for life” that were also part of the Liberal platform pay much less than what was offered under the old Pension Act to military personnel who retired before 2006 .

“Politicians need to stop expecting veterans will swoon at empty political promises,” Sean Bruyea, a veterans’ advocate, told a news conference on Tuesday.

“Our veterans deserve equal partnership at the democratic and policy table,” he said. Veterans deserve “universal programs for education, tuition and family support as well as a reinstatement of the lifelong Pension Act monthly payments, not scraps and crumbs from capricious campaign promises.”

While trying to muster support for his Liberal Party before the most recent federal vote, Justin Trudeau said he would restore the lifelong pensions that were scrapped when the New Veterans Charter came into effect in 2006. At the same time, Mr. Trudeau said: “We’ll also help them secure a bright future. We’ll cover the cost of four years of postsecondary education for every veteran who wants one.”

The Liberal campaign platform made the same promise, saying that “to help veterans re-enter the workforce and to help expand Canada’s skilled labour force, we will invest $80-million every year to create a new Veterans Education Benefit. This benefit will provide full support for the costs of up to four years of college, university, or technical education for Canadian Forces veterans after completion of service.”

But the Veterans’ Education and Training Benefit, which was announced in the 2017 budget, promised just $133.9-million over six years – an average of a little over $22-million a year. It is not available to all veterans as Mr. Trudeau promised, only those who left the military after April, 2006.

And the amount paid depends on how long the person has been a member of the Canadian Armed Forces. Those with less than six years of service will not qualify, and the maximum for those with less than 12 years will be $40,000.

Although about 5,000 members retire from the armed forces every year, the government predicts fewer than 140 new vets will receive the education benefit annually once a backlog of about 1,000 has been processed.

Questions about the benefit that were put to the office of Veterans Affairs Minister Seamus O’Regan and the Veterans Affairs department on Tuesday received no response by late afternoon.

Meanwhile, Brian Forbes, the chairman of the National Council of Veterans Associations of Canada, has conducted an analysis of the pensions for life that Mr. O’Regan announced for New Veterans Charter vets in December and found that they pay far less than what was offered under the Pension Act.

Brian Forbes


According to Mr. Forbes, the new pensions for life will pay a maximum of $3,650 a month to the most severely disabled vets, while the Pension Act pays as much as $7,444 a month to qualified disabled vets who retired before 2006.

Mr. O’Regan has said there is little disparity between the two programs, but Mr. Forbes says the numbers prove that the minister is misinformed.

The commitment to restore the pensions for life has been the subject of veterans’ expectations for the past three years, Mr. Forbes said.

But the pensions announced by the Liberal government “didn’t come close to closing the gap,” he said. “We take the view that that commitment has basically been unfulfilled.”

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-veterans-say-trudeau-liberals-broke-promise-on-education-benefit/
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Re: Veterans, accountability advocates accuse Team Trudeau of breaking campaign pledge

Post by Trooper on Wed 14 Mar 2018, 7:17 am

Trooper wrote:
Veterans say Trudeau Liberals broke promise on education benefit


GLORIA GALLOWAY
OTTAWA
PUBLISHED MARCH 13, 2018


Veterans and their supporters are accusing the federal Liberals of falling far short of a campaign commitment to provide all Canadians who have served in uniform with a university or college education.

The complaint that the new Education and Training Benefit does not match what was promised in the days before the 2015 election comes as veterans groups say the “pensions for life” that were also part of the Liberal platform pay much less than what was offered under the old Pension Act to military personnel who retired before 2006 .

“Politicians need to stop expecting veterans will swoon at empty political promises,” Sean Bruyea, a veterans’ advocate, told a news conference on Tuesday.

“Our veterans deserve equal partnership at the democratic and policy table,” he said. Veterans deserve “universal programs for education, tuition and family support as well as a reinstatement of the lifelong Pension Act monthly payments, not scraps and crumbs from capricious campaign promises.”

While trying to muster support for his Liberal Party before the most recent federal vote, Justin Trudeau said he would restore the lifelong pensions that were scrapped when the New Veterans Charter came into effect in 2006. At the same time, Mr. Trudeau said: “We’ll also help them secure a bright future. We’ll cover the cost of four years of postsecondary education for every veteran who wants one.”

The Liberal campaign platform made the same promise, saying that “to help veterans re-enter the workforce and to help expand Canada’s skilled labour force, we will invest $80-million every year to create a new Veterans Education Benefit. This benefit will provide full support for the costs of up to four years of college, university, or technical education for Canadian Forces veterans after completion of service.”

But the Veterans’ Education and Training Benefit, which was announced in the 2017 budget, promised just $133.9-million over six years – an average of a little over $22-million a year. It is not available to all veterans as Mr. Trudeau promised, only those who left the military after April, 2006.

And the amount paid depends on how long the person has been a member of the Canadian Armed Forces. Those with less than six years of service will not qualify, and the maximum for those with less than 12 years will be $40,000.

Although about 5,000 members retire from the armed forces every year, the government predicts fewer than 140 new vets will receive the education benefit annually once a backlog of about 1,000 has been processed.

Questions about the benefit that were put to the office of Veterans Affairs Minister Seamus O’Regan and the Veterans Affairs department on Tuesday received no response by late afternoon.

Meanwhile, Brian Forbes, the chairman of the National Council of Veterans Associations of Canada, has conducted an analysis of the pensions for life that Mr. O’Regan announced for New Veterans Charter vets in December and found that they pay far less than what was offered under the Pension Act.

Brian Forbes


According to Mr. Forbes, the new pensions for life will pay a maximum of $3,650 a month to the most severely disabled vets, while the Pension Act pays as much as $7,444 a month to qualified disabled vets who retired before 2006.

Mr. O’Regan has said there is little disparity between the two programs, but Mr. Forbes says the numbers prove that the minister is misinformed.

The commitment to restore the pensions for life has been the subject of veterans’ expectations for the past three years, Mr. Forbes said.

But the pensions announced by the Liberal government “didn’t come close to closing the gap,” he said. “We take the view that that commitment has basically been unfulfilled.”

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-veterans-say-trudeau-liberals-broke-promise-on-education-benefit/

That is the problem right there the taken away of the pension act. The pension act has been gone since 2006 and everything that has been done by our government to try distract Veterans away from the pension act by so called improvements has not distracted Veterans away from the pension act. It is my opinion that Veterans and Veteran groups will continue to fight for, and continue to address the merits the pension act has over what is in place today.
It is press conferences such as these that are needed to continue to enlighten the public the Veterans side of the story.
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Re: Veterans, accountability advocates accuse Team Trudeau of breaking campaign pledge

Post by Trooper on Wed 14 Mar 2018, 7:39 am

Trooper wrote:
Trooper wrote:
Veterans say Trudeau Liberals broke promise on education benefit


GLORIA GALLOWAY
OTTAWA
PUBLISHED MARCH 13, 2018


Veterans and their supporters are accusing the federal Liberals of falling far short of a campaign commitment to provide all Canadians who have served in uniform with a university or college education.

The complaint that the new Education and Training Benefit does not match what was promised in the days before the 2015 election comes as veterans groups say the “pensions for life” that were also part of the Liberal platform pay much less than what was offered under the old Pension Act to military personnel who retired before 2006 .

“Politicians need to stop expecting veterans will swoon at empty political promises,” Sean Bruyea, a veterans’ advocate, told a news conference on Tuesday.

“Our veterans deserve equal partnership at the democratic and policy table,” he said. Veterans deserve “universal programs for education, tuition and family support as well as a reinstatement of the lifelong Pension Act monthly payments, not scraps and crumbs from capricious campaign promises.”

While trying to muster support for his Liberal Party before the most recent federal vote, Justin Trudeau said he would restore the lifelong pensions that were scrapped when the New Veterans Charter came into effect in 2006. At the same time, Mr. Trudeau said: “We’ll also help them secure a bright future. We’ll cover the cost of four years of postsecondary education for every veteran who wants one.”

The Liberal campaign platform made the same promise, saying that “to help veterans re-enter the workforce and to help expand Canada’s skilled labour force, we will invest $80-million every year to create a new Veterans Education Benefit. This benefit will provide full support for the costs of up to four years of college, university, or technical education for Canadian Forces veterans after completion of service.”

But the Veterans’ Education and Training Benefit, which was announced in the 2017 budget, promised just $133.9-million over six years – an average of a little over $22-million a year. It is not available to all veterans as Mr. Trudeau promised, only those who left the military after April, 2006.

And the amount paid depends on how long the person has been a member of the Canadian Armed Forces. Those with less than six years of service will not qualify, and the maximum for those with less than 12 years will be $40,000.

Although about 5,000 members retire from the armed forces every year, the government predicts fewer than 140 new vets will receive the education benefit annually once a backlog of about 1,000 has been processed.

Questions about the benefit that were put to the office of Veterans Affairs Minister Seamus O’Regan and the Veterans Affairs department on Tuesday received no response by late afternoon.

Meanwhile, Brian Forbes, the chairman of the National Council of Veterans Associations of Canada, has conducted an analysis of the pensions for life that Mr. O’Regan announced for New Veterans Charter vets in December and found that they pay far less than what was offered under the Pension Act.

Brian Forbes


According to Mr. Forbes, the new pensions for life will pay a maximum of $3,650 a month to the most severely disabled vets, while the Pension Act pays as much as $7,444 a month to qualified disabled vets who retired before 2006.

Mr. O’Regan has said there is little disparity between the two programs, but Mr. Forbes says the numbers prove that the minister is misinformed.

The commitment to restore the pensions for life has been the subject of veterans’ expectations for the past three years, Mr. Forbes said.

But the pensions announced by the Liberal government “didn’t come close to closing the gap,” he said. “We take the view that that commitment has basically been unfulfilled.”

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-veterans-say-trudeau-liberals-broke-promise-on-education-benefit/

That is the problem right there the taken away of the pension act. The pension act has been gone since 2006 and everything that has been done by our government to try distract Veterans away from the pension act by so called improvements has not distracted Veterans away from the pension act. It is my opinion that Veterans and Veteran groups will continue to fight for, and continue to address the merits the pension act has over what is in place today.
It is press conferences such as these that are needed to continue to enlighten the public the Veterans side of the story.

Another problem I see here is having non medical Veterans fall under Veterans Affairs Canada where they should fall under Canadian Forces. An example would be the education benefit, this should fall under the CF, not Veterans Affairs. They are advertising improvements to the Veterans file where they include both medical, and non medical release Veterans giving the perception that these improvements go to the disabled Veterans. So in fact a large chunk of the funds they provide are going to non medically released Veterans. I'm not saying non medically released Veterans should not be entitled to benefits, I'm saying those benefits should be coming from the Canadian Forces umbrella.
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Re: Veterans, accountability advocates accuse Team Trudeau of breaking campaign pledge

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